3 Ways to Keep Mercury and Arsenic Out of Your Gluten-Free Diet

A few tips on how to avoid these toxins.

 

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Mercury and arsenic are toxic metals that have been associated with a higher risk of neurological problems, cancer, and heart disease. In the past, there have been some headlines relating these metals to a gluten-free diet (g-free), reporting that intake of gluten-free foods may expose one to higher toxic levels. Rice, often substituted in more significant amounts for wheat in gluten-free foods, may store arsenic and mercury due to soil and environmental elements. Therefore, researchers from the University of Illinois set out to examine possible health consequences of a g-free diet vs. a non-gluten free diet. The study ranged from 2009-2014, and participants (73 persons) were chosen if they adhered to a gluten-free diet for those years. Subjects ages varied from 6 years old to 80 years, and participants consented to a blood and urinalysis.

The results showed the participant’s mercury blood levels were 70% higher and urine tests showed twice the arsenic concentrations compared to the non-gluten group. Therefore, the study determined that following a gluten-free diet may result in unexpected health outcomes. Keep in mind; however, the researchers did not examine if rice was the primary cause of metals in the participant’s diets, the study population was small, and the amounts of the metals associated with mercury poisoning and arsenic toxicity were much lower in both participants diets (gluten and non-gluten foods). The research does not mean that going gluten-free will automatically increase your intake of these metals, but it is a good indicator to take caution when choosing g-free foods. Below are three tips on how to optimize your health if gluten-free is the food plan for you.

Eat more whole, fresh foods

Who doesn’t love a slice a pizza (actually, that really sounds good about now!!) or a cookie every now and then? Pizza, cookies, and almost any food these days can be found gluten-free. And what do most of these goods have in common? Many are made with rice and refined flour, as well as added sugar, sodium, and other unwanted additives. Refined flour is stripped of fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants; in other words, it’s highly processed. So, if you are following the “healthy brick road,” some of those g-free treats should be consumed as a treat; only on occasions and not part of the daily staples.

Please note: Simply being gluten-free does not give all products the green light consumption. To ensure clean eating, strive for fresh, whole, minimally processed foods instead of g-free products that contain ingredients you probably cannot pronounce.

Alternate gluten-free foods

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There are various types of gluten-free grains, such as amaranth, teff, corn, millet, sorghum, oats, quinoa, buckwheat, and don’t forget pulses, which include beans, lentils, chickpeas, and peas. Starchy vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, yams, fingerling potatoes, and squash are also g-free. Your goal for meal planning is to choose whole, fresh, natural foods and switch up your selections every now and then. For example, try sweet potato toast and a side of blacks beans with your omelet for breakfast, add lentils or quinoa to your lunch salad, munch on veggies and hummus for your daily snack, and try out spaghetti squash for dinner.

Consume low-mercury seafood

Despite the mercury found in this study, seafood is a significant contributor to a healthy diet. To determine what sea dwellers to avoid, check out the EPA-FDA’s 2017 Advice on Consuming Fish and Shellfish. You should be safe consuming rainbow trout, clams, shrimp, Alaskan salmon, and Atlantic mackerel; however, air on the side of caution with lobster, canned tuna, sea bass, mahi-mahi, crab, and cod, and consume swordfish, king mackerel, grouper, and shark at your own risk. The latter options have shown to contain the highest amounts of mercury.

Just like any eating plan, strive for a healthy balance of the real stuff, don’t be afraid to try new foods, and save those treats for occasions!

Nutrition Nugget

Make time for breakfast! If you skip breakfast, it’s harder to get all the nutrients your body needs throughout the day. Breakfast can be as simple as a piece of fruit and whole grain toast, or low-fat yogurt.

W.O.Day Nugget

Curtal: Shortened, abridged, or curtailed

Inspiration Nugget

Dear God, If I am wrong, right me, if I am lost, guide me, if I start to give up, keep me going. Lead me in light and love.

“Continuing to seek happiness in all the wrong places, people, and things are what drives our cycle of suffering. Yes, we would prefer the luxury life of cozy and secure, the comfortable over the uncomfortable but these safety zones continue to fall apart and offer no true comfort. We cannot keep ourselves enclosed in a cocoon with a limited view of reality and avoid discomfort and pain if true happiness, security, and comfort is what we seek.”

~ Me

 

 

Less fat, more hair and younger skin: Study in mice shows benefits from calorie-restricted diet

The effects of a restricted calorie (CR) diet on skin has not been thoroughly researched, until now. In Brazil, researchers have concluded that mice live longer when their diets are calorie limited. The study also found that fat reserves in adipose tissue, which aids in insulating the body, was reduced.

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To offset the effects of the diet, the mice skin stimulated fur growth and increased blood flow to warm the skin (an adaptive response). The authors also observed changes in cell metabolism while following the diet. “The changes in fur and skin were highly perceptible,” Kowaltowski said. “These changes are interesting because they appeared after only a few months when the animals were not yet old.” The study lasted six months and involved two groups of mice. One group (CR) was fed around 60% of the calories consumed by the other group (the control ), which was fed a pleasure diet (PD). The mice were free to eat as much food and as often as they chose. At the end of the study, the CR mice had 40% less body mass compared to the PD group, which became obese. The researchers speculated this was because the mice did not gain as much weight as the comparison group, not because of weight loss.

A thicker, longer, more uniform coat was also observed in the CR group, and it was suggested to be an adaptive response due to diminished fat. “Fur has properties that insulate animals to retain warmth,” Kowaltowski said. “We believe this is an adaptation present in mammals. Those that eat less have less fat, and they need more fur or body hair as thermal insulation.” Three times more blood vessels were seen in the CR mice, which increased blood flow to the skin. Differences in skin cell metabolism between groups were also noted, and in the obese mice, signs of premature aging arose. “The change in vasoconstriction helped the slimmer mice stay warm, and their skin also remained young,” Kowaltowski said.

To confirm that the extra fur was keeping the CR mice warm, the researchers shaved parts of the skin in both groups during the second stage of the study. “We shaved the mice and observed their evolution for one month,” Kowaltowski said. The researchers measured the loss of body heat and found that thicker fur did indeed help the mice retain warmth. “CR mice lost muscle mass and became lethargic,” Kowaltowski said. “This metabolic change directly resulted from the loss of body heat to the environment. The mice were unable to live well without fur.”

Additionally, both groups had their skin colored blue to examine if there was a difference in fur thickness, and the results showed that the PD mice had thinner fur compared to the CR mice. “They lost less fur, and their fur remained thick for longer. This could be an adaptation to avoid energy expenditure on growing fur,” Kowaltowski said. “These discoveries are particularly significant since they reveal not just a pronounced effect of the CR diet on the skin but also an adaptive mechanism to deal with the reduced insulation due to skin changes under conditions of lower caloric intake.”

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Defending the Liver

Kowaltowski and colleagues also revealed that a restricted calorie diet might protect the liver from a heart attack (short-term ceasing of blood flow). “When we compared mice fed ad libitum with mice fed a CR diet, we found a huge difference,” Kowaltowski said. “Approximately 25% of the liver was damaged in the former group, and only 1% was damaged in the latter.” The research design suspended roughly 70% of blood flow to the liver, for 40 minutes to stimulate a heart attack. This event increased tissue calcium and created a collapse of mitochondria functioning and termination of individual liver cells.

“Calcium is important to regulate mitochondrial metabolism and increase ATP [adenosine triphosphate, the molecule that stores energy] production. However, an excessive amount of calcium causes the organelles to stop working properly. Therefore, our hypothesis was that the observed benefit of the diet was related to an increase in the capacity of the mitochondria to capture calcium from the intracellular medium without ceasing to produce energy,” said Sergio Menezes-Filho, a researcher at IQ-USP and first author of the article. To interpret the mechanisms involved and to explore the hypothesis, in vitro experiments were conducted by segregating mitochondria from both mice groups and locating it in an incubation medium with a fluorescent probe that radiated brighter as calcium levels increased. The CR mice were again fed 60% of the control mice’s intake while the control group was fed PD.

“We added a small amount of calcium to the medium, and the fluorescence intensified. As the mitochondria captured the calcium, the brightness diminished. We added a little more. When the mitochondria reached maximum calcium uptake capacity, calcium began returning to the incubation medium, and fluorescence increased even without the addition of more calcium,” Menezes-Filho explained. The researchers detected that, without functional impairment, the mitochondria in the PD mice absorbed nearly 70% less calcium and had few ATP molecules compared to the CR mice.

According to Kowaltowski, “We do not yet know why the mitochondria of the mice fed ad libitum have less ATP, but this difference is certainly associated with their calcium uptake capacity.” “When we artificially matched the ATP levels in both groups by adding ATP to control mitochondria or reducing it in CR mitochondria, calcium uptake also became equal.” The objective of the research is to explore the effects of a restricted calorie diet on different bodily tissues. “Simply telling people to eat less is not working. Obesity has become a global epidemic. We are trying to understand how CR acts in the organism and which molecules are involved to identify targets for preventing or treating diseases associated with weight gain and age,” Kowaltowski said.

**** I hesitated to post this research in the event someone may read it and use it as a reason to restrict calories. As one who has been in recovery from Anorexia Nervosa for 4 years (I struggled for almost 20 years), restricting calories for the reasons that you have will only make you more unhappy in the end. If you are struggling, please get help by clicking here or talk to a trusted friend or family member or contact me!

Adapted from: 

  1. Maria Fernanda Forni, Julia Peloggia, Tárcio T. Braga, Jesús Eduardo Ortega Chinchilla, Jorge Shinohara, Carlos Arturo Navas, Niels Olsen Saraiva Camara, Alicia J. Kowaltowski. Caloric Restriction Promotes Structural and Metabolic Changes in the SkinCell Reports, 2017; 20 (11): 2678 DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.08.052
  2. Sergio L. Menezes-Filho, Ignacio Amigo, Fernanda M. Prado, Natalie C. Ferreira, Marcia K. Koike, Isabella F.D. Pinto, Sayuri Miyamoto, Edna F.S. Montero, Marisa H.G. Medeiros, Alicia J. Kowaltowski. Caloric restriction protects livers from ischemia/reperfusion damage by preventing Ca 2 -induced mitochondrial permeability transitionFree Radical Biology and Medicine, 2017; 110: 219 DOI: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2017.06.01

 

Nutritional Nugget

Spice up your meals (and your life)! Flavor foods by adding herbs and spices, rather than salt. You can buy fresh or dried herbs and spices. Better yet, grow your own!

WOD Nugget

Miscreant: A person who has done something wrong or unlawful

*Notice the “Mis?” It’s us women who have no limits!  ­

Inspirational  Nugget
Just be yourself. Let people see the real, imperfect, flawed, quirky, weird, beautiful and magical person that your are. - Mandy Hale
“We suffer, not because we are bad or deserve to be punished, but because we mistakenly take change to always be permanent, we suffer. Because we mistake our flaws and “oops” for unchangables characterists and actions, we suffer.
Because we mistake that the “grass is greener on the other side, we suffer. And we remain stagnant in situations, with habits that continuously bring us sorrow.”
~Me

How to Beat Back Cravings When Just Seeing Sweets Makes You Lust for Them

Do you get “weak in the willpower” when office donuts arrive? Ever scarfed down that last slice or two of your favorite cake, or a homemade brownie, or that leftover Halloween candy that your colleagues keep bringing in to work after you’ve checked your hunger level and told self, “nope, not hungry at all?” Then, I’m going to assume that you are well aware that sweat treats, when insight, can lead to severe sugar cravings. Foods that are bathed primarily in fat, sugar, flavors, and additives are known as hyper-palatable, and these foods release dopamine, a neurotransmitter released when neurons are triggered. Dopamine is the driving factor to your consumption of that sweet treat staring at you.

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“A lot of people don’t make the connection that there’s something physiological happening when they see hyper-palatable foods,” says Eliza Kingsford, a psychotherapist. “This is not a signal that your body is hungry or needs nutrients; instead, it is a response to dopamine.” It is possible; however, to control cravings. Walking past the cookie jar or the ice cream isle can be bearable with a few tips and tricks.

Step 1: Keep moving

Cut ties with those yummy desserts. Instead of watching your favorite Food Network show, put in a non-food movie. See caramel and chocolate while surfing the net? Click on the link to pay bills in your favorites bar. The candy jar at work? Don’t walk past it and if you have to, phone a friend.

“Sometimes it’s as simple as out of sight, out of mind,” says Keri Gans, RD, author of The Small Change Diet. “Distancing yourself can lessen the craving.”

Step 2: Distract yourself

You made it out alive after passing the cookie jar and not giving in, but you still have a sweet tooth craving, so what do you do? You set the mind on anything besides sugar, suggests Gans. Phone a friend, study something (there is always new research to be learned), brush your teeth. “You want to do anything besides sitting there and thinking about the food,” says Gans.

Step 3: Get mindful

It is inevitable that situations and events will arise where you can’t turn or run away from food, like a mad person; this is when mindfulness comes in handy. Take a breath, slow down, and get in touch with how the craving feels. Is the desire really what you want? The choice is yours. Image result for How to Beat Back Cravings When Just Seeing Sweets Makes You Lust for Them

Step 4: Relish every bite

Unfortunately, this step doesn’t work for everyone. If you’re like me and have ever devoured an entire pint or more of cookie dough ice cream or any ice cream or any sweet bite, then you are likely in the “unfortunate” category. However, if you have the willpower to stop after that small bite, I truly admire you, and you are exempt from the “unfortunate” class! For the rest of us, try to keep your attention on the mouthfeel and sweetness. If you want to make it more pleasurable, shout from the rooftops, “I love how the frosting and whipped cream melts on my tongue, and that cake is so moist!”

Step 5: Set realistic guidelines

Ok, you know you’re heading into a temptation zone, like Halloween; however, surrendering yourself to the candy jar or the Halloween stash brought in by the youngens probably won’t work. So, make a few rules, such as one small piece daily and don’t veer from that rule.

Step 6: Make a negative association

Are you triggered by fluffy pancakes or melting ice cream sandwich ads on TV? Consider the reality behind those commercials, says Kingsford: “There are billions of dollars poured into the marketing industry to elicit food cravings,” she says. “But what you see in those images is sprayed-on lacquer, crazy chemicals to make foods melt a certain way, dyes and markers, and weird lighting. Would you eat that? No, that’s disgusting.”

Step 7: Reflect on how you will feel if you give in

Ask yourself,  “Do I really want this sugar bomb?” If yes, then ask, “Will I feel shame and guilt if I eat it?” If you are still stuck, go back to question 1 “Do I really, really want this sweet goody?” After you have made it this far into the thought process, your mind is ready to move to the next subject and say “toodles” to that dessert.

The finale: Keep a healthier version of a favorite treat on hand.

If your mouth waters every time your co-worker opens a bag of M&Ms, try packing your own clean treat, so you don’t feel deprived, such as a granola bar, yogurt, fruit. And if it’s baked goods you crave, bring a homemade version of the “clean” treat sweetened with maple syrup instead of refined sugar.

You can do! Have faith and believe in yourself and know one set back is not a lifetime of regret. You are human so live life and enjoy it! You never know when the next challenge will hit.

Nutritional Nugget

Take grains on the go! Popcorn, whole-grain rice cakes, and crackers are convenient, on-the-go snacks. Be sure to make at least half your grains whole.

WODal Nugget

Invigorate: To give strength and/or energy to something or someone

Inspirational Nugget

And every day, the world will drag you by the hand, yelling, "This is important! And this is important! And this is important! You need to worry about this! And this! And this!" And each day, it's up to you to yank your hand back, put it on your heart and say, "No. This is what's important." - Iain Thomas, I Wrote This For You

“Pleasant and unpleasant situations are both part of our lives that is inevitable.”

~ Me

 

Should you be drinking kombucha?

Soft drink sales are falling, but kombucha sales are rising! Homebrewers have been producing this favored fermented drink for thousands of years, and increasingly we see kombucha on the drink menus at restaurants, on tap in cafes and health food stores, and in supermarkets. So what is it? Is it good for us? Is all kombucha created equal????

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What is kombucha, exactly?

Traditionally, it is a drink produced by fermenting sweet tea, resulting in a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast (S.C.O.B.Y.). During the process, sugar is converted from yeast and produces alcohol. The bacteria then convert the alcohol to organic acids, such as acetic acid, and the lightly effervescent, mildly sour, refreshing drink, kombucha, is created. You often find it bottled in flavors like ginger, passionfruit, lemon, and raspberry. Kombucha is touted, not only for its low sugar content but also for its health benefits, such as stimulating the immune system, preventing cardiovascular disease and some cancers.

And with Coca-Cola buying into the kombucha craze, it’s only going to increase in mainstream popularity.

Is it good for me?

With all the hype, it’s understandable to wonder if kombucha is something you should be drinking on a regular basis. There are many reported beneficial effects of kombucha, and some brands even suggest you should drink a bottle each day to reap the benefits.

Kombucha certainly has a lot going on:

  • It contains live cultures of bacteria and yeast, which can act as probiotics, and studies have concluded that these live microorganisms may benefit their host by protecting against diseases, improving digestion, and enhancing immune function.
    The organic acids produced during the fermentation process have been shown to slow the growth of pathogenic bacteria, such as Staph aureus, Salmonella, and E. coli.
  • Because Kombucha is made from tea, it contains polyphenols (naturally occurring plant chemicals) known as catechins, which have antioxidant properties and can protect or act against some cancers, tumors, and unwanted genetic changes.

Kombucha is a potential source for a range of bioactive components, and these components can significantly differ based on the quantity and types of sugar and tea used, the microorganisms presents, and fermenting temperature and time.
Whether these bioactive components make it into the gut in sufficient numbers to have a beneficial impact is up for debate and varies based on an individuals gut flora. According to senior research scientist Dr. Michael Conlon, who specializes in diet and gut health, “The health potential of probiotics more generally can vary depending on the number and type of microbes, what you consume them with, and the composition of your gut microflora. It’s likely the number of microbes in kombucha would be much lower than what you might see in a commercial probiotic product.” He added that “fermentation generates certain types of acid and other bioactive compounds that can be beneficial, but whether they get through to the large bowel so that a benefit can be gained is unknown.”

Research regarding the claimed benefits has mostly been studied on animals. Conlon continues with “there’s a lack of scientific evidence from human clinical trials to support the claims, and more research is needed.” Image result for should you be drinking kombucha

But, what about the sugar?

Throughout the fermentation process, most of the sugar is consumed by the yeast, and any residual left is based on fermenting time. As per the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a product can only be labeled “low sugar” if it contains 25% less sugar that it’s original brand or no more than 0.5g to be labeled “sugar-free.” The sugar content per an 8 oz bottle of most unflavored kombucha products is roughly 2-6g. Those that favor more on the sweeter side are still a better choice; when compared to the standard soft drink, Coca-Cola (39g sugar per 12oz), Orange Juice (9g per 3.5oz), Gatorade (6g per 3.5 oz), Lipton Mango Ice Tea (11g per 8.5oz), Glaceau Vitamin Water (32g per 20oz). Sugary drinks provide excess calories, and excess calories may lead to obesity, weight gain, some types of cancer, type-2-diabetes, and heart disease, to name a few. Therefore, the increased availability of lower sugar alternatives, like kombucha, can make a real difference, and for someone with a coke-a-day habit that adds up to a whopping 12,700g.

Does it contain alcohol?

Some alcohol remains in kombucha after the fermentation process, but it’s usually in trace amounts, and because it is sold as a soft drink it needs to comply with state-based alcohol legislation and labeled with its alcohol content (less than 0.5% alcohol by volume in the United States). However, controlling the fermentation to achieve a product with just enough acidity and sweetness, and ensuring the alcohol content meets state-based regulations is a balancing act, one that’s particularly tricky when producing on a large scale. There have been occurrences where the alcohol content went a little wild, and products were recalled. In 2010, the grocery chain, Whole Foods Market, (now owned by Amazon), recalled all kombucha products on its shelves including multimillion-dollar brand leader GT’s Kombucha, when samples tested were found to be more alcoholic than labeled.

When kombucha is not getting recalled, its minimal alcohol content can be a significant drawcard. The non-alcoholic options may be limited in pubs and bars, you may not like soft drinks and get tired of drinking juice and sparkling water, so Kombucha may be a good alternative. Although it is low in alcohol, its tart, lightly acidic flavor profile and palate-cleansing properties make it a drink that readily complements food, much like wine. Who knows, maybe you can reduce your alcohol consumption by pairing kombucha with your favorite foods instead of that glass of wine (but, let me know how that works out if you do make the swap).

Should I drink it?

Kombucha may be touted as ‘an immortal health elixir, a ‘living superfood’ that’s ‘rich in antioxidants and acids, and has the potential for containing beneficial health properties. But there is no guarantee that these features directly translate into actual health benefits or that drinking it will ‘make you feel great.’ A claim that ‘it harmonizes your body, mind and spirit’ is puffery. However, if you like the taste, you’re looking for an exciting alternative to alcohol or sugary soft drinks, or you don’t mind the price tag (roughly $5-10 per 16oz bottle in the supermarket), kombucha may be the drink for you.

Is all kombucha created equal?

Currently, there is no standard definition for kombucha, so products sold can vary widely. Compared to traditional recipes, kombucha sold in supermarkets, etc. have little similarities. Producers have gone into “overdrive” in production because of high demand. To make sure you “get what you pay for,” check drink labels and educate yourself:

  • Ingredients? If you see live cultures floating at the top, that is a good indicator the drink is made from a S.C.O.B.Y. but take caution with ingredients like “kombucha extract.”
  • Reefer? Refrigeration prevents further fermentation, which can affect the taste and produce more alcohol, so if the kombucha you buy does not require refrigeration, it may have been pasteurized. While this can help control the alcohol content and extend shelf life, the drink will likely have fewer active microorganisms as a result. Always refrigerate the fermented beverage before consumption, unless it has been pasteurized. However, although yeast has been filtered and the alcohol content is stabilized, at warmer temperatures, any remaining yeast, and other microbes can still grow and be active, posing a health risk.
  • ETOH content? Research the company to see how often they sample their product’s alcohol contents. Some companies may check the content of each batch or less frequently, such as once a year.
  • Added sweeteners? One of the main ingredients needed to make kombucha is sugar, but this is mostly used up during fermentation. Some products may contain non-nutritive sweeteners erythritol and stevia that make the kombucha taste sweeter without adding calories, which may or may not appeal depending on your stance on added sweeteners.
  • Outrageous health claims? Therapeutic claims are not permitted on foods, and if a company wants to state on the label that its kombucha has a specific health effect, the claim has to be one of those pre-approved under the FDA. The product, also, must meet certain conditions, and if you see a claim that “seems to good to be true,” it probably is.

Is Kombucha safe?

According to U.S. federal laws and regulations, kombucha is considered a traditional food. In other words, it does not require pre-approval, and there are no specific quality controls or manufacturing practices for it (as long as the alcohol content is not above 0.5% or continues to ferment after bottling), other than the general requirement under the FDA that it be safe and suitable. In 1995 the possibility of toxic effects and acidosis when consumed in large quantities became a public concern after two incidents in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC); however, both parties had severe pre-existing conditions that made them susceptible to acidosis. The investigations concluded that kombucha is not harmful when consumed in small quantities (roughly 4 ounces daily) unless of course, you have pre-existing conditions. In 2010, some commercial producers were forced to recall unpasteurized versions from grocery store shelves when the alcohol content exceeded 0.5%.

Yes, kombucha poses a higher risk when not prepared correctly but most forms of this fermented food represent a relatively low threat. The popularity and commercialization of the brewed drinks are increasing and with growth and the “popular vote,” comes work in promoting best manufacturing practices.

Nutritional Nugget

How do you like your apples? Sweet, crisp apples can be paired with almost anything! Dip into peanut butter for a quick snack or toss in a salad for that perfectly sweet crunch.

WODal Nugget

Melisma: A group of notes sung to one syllable of text

Inspirational Nugget

God's plan is always the best. Sometimes the process is painful and hard. But don't forget that when God is silent, He is doing something good for you.

 

Pain is an inevitable part of human life, as is pleasure. The difference with pain; however, is – we have to grow up to the fact, mature to the fact, and relax to the fact that there will be pain in our lives, but there should also be a good balance of pleasure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Types Of Noodles That Are Healthier Than Past

When it comes to wellness, it’s all about balance, where nutrient ratio, portion size, and mindfulness can keep you on track with your health and fitness goals.

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So, you’re still allowing “self” to have pasta on occasions, but did you know that giving in to your indulgences, sometimes those “guilty pleasures,” and enjoying a diversity of foods is actually good for the body and soul? Plus, you’ll be more inclined to choose healthier options in the long run when you allow yourself to “give in.” Another plus, if your pasta choice is whole wheat and is roughly a 1/2 cup cooked portion size, then it’s not necessary to consume this yummy carbohydrate only on occasions (unless you have a medical condition that states otherwise). Unfortunately, you can’t eat pasta all day, every day (yeah, I’m still bummed about that!). It’s not exactly healthy if you do, so here are a few options to amp up the nutritional profile, when you’ve already had your days worth of pasta, or you are doing a bit of carb counting.

Edamame Noodles

Edamame isn’t just a great appetizer at an Asian restaurant, it is also a soy-based, protein-rich noodle, and one that pairs well with several flavors, such as pesto dishes (the green color matches perfectly) and a good old-fashioned tomato sauce. And the nutritional benefits? A 1-cup serving of edamame noodles has 25 grams of protein, 210 calories, and 11 grams of fiber. Related image

Chickpea Noodles

Although they’re lower in protein (roughly 14 grams) and fiber (8 grams), they are an excellent alternative, especially for people who don’t tolerate soy or gluten products well. And, you can find these noodles in many grocery stores.

Black Bean

Instead of throwing some black beans on a salad, try eating them in noodle form. With the same nutritional profile as edamame, but with less protein, it’s a good idea to pair these beans with lean meat, tofu, or fish for a more satisfying, muscle-building meal. Black beans are also versatile and high in fiber, so they’ll keep you regular and full. And for a healthy dose of fats, top with avocado and serve at your next Mexican “fiesta” night.

Shirataki Noodles

Did you ever think you could have a zero calorie pasta dish? Well, you can. These noodles are incredibly useful for carb-conscious people, as they have less than one gram per 1 cup serving. Made from konjac flour and water, they are a great way to “fill up,” with few calories. However, to make a complete meal, you will need to add some extra protein and fats. Some good choices? Stir-fry or pair with meat, fish, or tofu to make it more substantial. And, as these are popular in Asian cuisine, you can try a thick, rich peanut sauce to get it to really stick to your bones.

Nutritional Nugget

Vary your protein routine… with seeds! Save your pumpkin seeds. Dry, roast and serve them in salads or enjoy as a crunchy snack.

WODal Nugget

Saudade: (especially with reference to songs or poetry) A feeling of longing, melancholy, or nostalgia that is supposedly characteristic of the Portuguese or Brazilian temperament.

Inspirational Nugget

Fall in love with souls, not faces.

“In the teachings on the four noble truths, suffering is talked about. The first noble truth says simply that it’s part of being human to feel discomfort. If we resist it, the reality and vitality of life become misery. The second noble truth says that this resistance is the fundamental operating mechanism of what we call ego. The third noble truth says that the cessation of suffering is letting go of holding on to ourselves. There is no need to resist being fully alive in this world.”

~Pema ChÖdrÖn

 

 

 

 

 

New way to treat cholesterol may be on the horizon

A breakthrough discovery by scientists at Houston Methodist could change the way we treat cholesterol. Researchers found new evidence that challenges a 40-year notion of how fast we eliminate it from our bodies.

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This accidental discovery, made by medical biochemist Henry Pownall, Ph.D., and his team at the Houston Methodist Research Institute, reveals a new pathway in the cholesterol-elimination chain that will be key to developing new drugs to lower cholesterol. Their findings are described in an article titled “ABCA1-Derived Nascent High-Density Lipoprotein-Apo AI, and Lipids Metabolically Segregate,” appearing online Oct. 26 and in print Nov. 21 in the American Heart Association’s Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology journal. Pownall, who is the corresponding author, said the initial purpose of their study was to prove the current model of cholesterol transport through the body was correct. It turns out, however, that the model was not quite right.

“The model people have been using for 40 years presumed that cholesterol was transported from the arteries with other lipids and proteins and entered a particle that stayed in the blood for several days before being cleared by the liver for disposal,” Pownall said. “What we discovered in the process was something different. We discovered the cholesterol skips all these steps and goes directly from this first particle to the liver in two minutes. This is a thousand times faster than what was formerly suspected.” Related image

While most studies look at HDL cholesterol in its mature form found in blood, Pownall and his colleagues studied cholesterol in nascent HDL, an early kind of HDL produced by cells. Cholesterol in the nascent HDL goes directly to the liver, mainly skipping conversion to the mature form of HDL. Pownall stresses that it’s not that current practices of treating “bad” LDL cholesterol are incorrect, but instead that physicians and researchers need to better understand how the “good” HDL cholesterol contributes to cardiovascular disease and how to raise it in a way that protects the heart, because some patients with very high HDL numbers, which were always thought to be beneficial, are actually at risk. “LDL cholesterol, the so-called ‘bad cholesterol’ is well controlled with the current statin therapies. The track record for these cholesterol-lowering drugs is indisputable, and they will continue to work,” Pownall said. “HDL, or the ‘good cholesterol,’ however, is a much trickier system. Not everything that raises it protects the heart and not everything that lowers it is terrible for you. We will need to redesign new drugs to lower plasma cholesterol in a way that takes into account this new mechanism. We will look for interventions, maybe dietary (why of course!), perhaps pharmacological, that raise HDL cholesterol in a way that helps protect the arteries and prevent cardiovascular disease.”

Adapted from: Bingqing Xu, Baiba K. Gillard, Antonio M. Gotto, Corina Rosales, Henry J. Pownall. ABCA1-Derived Nascent High-Density Lipoprotein–Apolipoprotein AI and Lipids Metabolically SegregateArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 2017; ATVBAHA.117.310290 DOI: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.117.310290

Nutritional Nugget

Move to low-fat or fat-free milk or yogurt! Smoothies are a great way to enjoy dairy during the early morning rush. For a quick breakfast, blend yogurt with banana, peanut butter & ice.

WODal Nugget 

Timeous: In good time; sufficiently early

Inspirational Nugget

 

“There are three categories of suffering or pain to include: All-pervading pain, the pain of alternation and the pain of pain. All-pervading pain is the general pain of dissatisfaction, separation and loneliness. The sense of alternation between pain and its absence, again and again, is itself painful. And then there is the pain of pain. Resisting pain only increases its intensity.”

~Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche

 

 

 

Imported candy at top of contaminated food list in California

Following a state law mandating testing, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) issued more alerts for lead in candy than for the other top three sources of food-borne contamination combined, according to the first analysis of outcomes of the 2006 law by researchers at UC San Francisco and CDPH.

For many years, the state health department’s Food and Drug Branch has routinely prepared and disseminated health alerts to regional and county public health programs, practicing community clinicians, and the general public warning of potentially toxic food exposures. However, until the 2006 law mandated a surveillance program, the CDPH did not test widely for lead in candy. The new study shows that in the six years before the law went into effect, from 2001 to 2006, only 22 percent of the alerts about food contamination involved lead in candy. Once the program was implemented, however, 42 percent of the food contamination alerts issued by state health officials were for lead in candy, nearly all of it imported, which was more than the total for SalmonellaE. coli, and botulism, according to an analysis of alerts issued between 2001 and 2014. The study was published Oct. 26, 2017, in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Lead is a toxic heavy metal that can cause developmental delays, neurological damage, hearing loss, and other serious health problems in young children and adults. The study found that active community monitoring can identify lead in food products such as candy so they can be recalled before too many people have eaten them. Without such testing, health investigators must wait until after children have been poisoned to look for the sources, which is especially difficult when the source is as perishable as candy. “With this policy change identifying lead sources is more upstream and community-based,” said Margaret Handley, Ph.D., MPH, a professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at UCSF and the first author of the study. “By testing candy and issuing alerts when foods are found to be contaminated, we can identify and remove sources of lead before children become poisoned.”Image result for Imported candy at top of contaminated food list in California

As many as 10,000 California children under the age of six are poisoned by lead each year, and 1,000 of them are exposed to very high levels of the toxic metal. Most efforts to reduce exposure focus on the lead found in gasoline and industrially contaminated soil, as well as lead-based paint, which children take in when they eat paint chips or breathe in dust. However, after several high-profile poisoning cases, the California legislature passed a law requiring the state health department’s Food and Drug Branch to increase surveillance of lead in candy and to issue health alerts when levels are high. Over the 14-year study period, state public health officials issued 164 health alerts for food contamination. Of these, 60 were lead-related, and 55 of those were from imported food, mostly candy from Mexico (34 percent), China (24 percent) and India (20 percent). Two alerts were issued for imported foods that were not candy: One for a toasted grasshopper snack called chapuline, the other for spices.

To get an in-depth look at how well the testing program was working, the study analyzed data for the years 2011-2012 and found that state officials had tested 1,346 candies. Of these, 65 different products were found to contain lead, and 40 of those exceeded the federal limits for children (.10 parts per million). These candies came from a more diverse set of countries compared to the overall 2001 to 2014 samples; just over a third (35 percent) came from India. The others came from Taiwan (12 percent), China (11 percent), Mexico (9 percent), Pakistan (6 percent), Hong Kong (4 percent), the United Kingdom (3 percent), and one sample each from Germany, Indonesia, Thailand, Turkey, and Spain.

Since the candy testing program is not comprehensive, the researchers said the actual number of contaminated candies and other foods on the market could be even higher. “As more lead sources are identified we must develop prevention approaches for all of them, and not just replace one prevention approach with another,” Handley said. “If there is anything we have learned from the lead poisoning disaster in Flint, Michigan, it is not to oversimplify or cut corners when it comes to identifying and removing sources of lead poisoning.”

Adapted from: University of California – San Francisco. “Imported candy at top of contaminated food list in California: More health alerts issued for lead in candy than for Salmonella, E. coli or Botulism.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 October 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171026085753.htm>

Nutritional Nugget

Prepare for the after-school rush! Prep small containers of fruits and veggies the night before so kids can help themselves when they get home.

WODal Nugget

Arita: A type of Japanese porcelain characterized by asymmetric decoration

Inspirational Nugget
Do good for others. It will come back in unexpected ways.

“At some point, we need to stop identifying with our weaknesses and shift our allegiance to our basic goodness. It’s highly beneficial to understand that our limitations are not absolute and monolithic, but relative and removable.”

~Pema ChÖdrÖn