Eating Disorders-Classifications

Currently recognized in medical manuals

These eating disorders are specified as mental disorders in standard medical manuals, such as the International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems, 10th Edition (ICD-10), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) or both.

  • Anorexia nervosa (AN), characterized by lack of maintenance of a healthy body weight, an obsessive fear of gaining weight or refusal to do so, and an unrealistic perception, or non-recognition of the seriousness, of current low body weight. Anorexia can cause menstruation to stop, and often leads to bone loss, loss of skin integrity, etc. It greatly stresses the heart, increasing the risk of heart attacks and related heart problems. The risk of death is greatly increased in individuals with this disease. The most underlining factor researchers are starting to take notice of is that it may not just be a vanity, social, or media issue, but it could also be related to biological and or genetic components.
  • Bulimia nervosa (BN), characterized by recurrent binge eating followed by compensatory behaviors such as purging (self-induced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives/diuretics, or excessive exercise). Fasting and over-exercising may also be used as a method of purging following a binge.
  • Binge eating disorder (BED), characterized by binge eating at least 2–3 times a week without compensatory behavior along with feelings of shame and guilt after overeating. The disorder can develop within individuals of a wide range of ages and socioeconomic classes.
  • Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED) is an eating or feeding disorder that does not meet full DSM-5 criteria for AN, BN, or BED. Examples of otherwise-specified eating disorders include individuals with atypical anorexia nervosa, who meet all criteria for AN except being underweight, despite substantial weight loss; atypical bulimia nervosa, who meet all criteria for BN except that bulimic behaviors are less frequent or have not been ongoing for long enough; purging disorder; and night eating syndrome.

Not currently recognized in standard medical manuals

  • Compulsive overeating, (COE), in which individuals habitually graze on large quantities of food rather than bingeing, as would be typical of binge eating disorder.
  • Diabulimia, characterized by the deliberate manipulation of insulin levels by diabetics in an effort to control their weight.
  • Food maintenance, characterized by a set of aberrant eating behaviors of children in foster care.
  • Orthorexia nervosa, a term used to characterize an obsession with a “pure” diet, in which people develop an obsession with avoiding unhealthy foods to the point where it interferes with a person’s life.
  • Selective eating disorder (SED), also called picky eating, is an extreme sensitivity to how something tastes. A person with SED may or may not be a supertaster.
  • Drunkorexia, commonly characterized by purposely restricting food intake in order to reserve food calories for alcoholic calories, exercising excessively in order to burn calories consumed from drinking, and over-drinking alcohols in order to purge previously consumed food.
  • Pregorexia, characterized by extreme dieting and over-exercising in order to control pregnancy weight gain. Under-nutrition during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, hypertension, cardiovascular disease risk, and depression.

Tip of the Day

Be active your way. Mix it up! There are endless ways to be active, such as walking, biking, dancing, martial arts, gardening, and playing ball. Try out different activities to see what you like best and add variety.

Daily Inspiration

Arise, shine, for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord has risen upon you.

~ Isiah 60:1

Lord, shine the light of your word on the path of my life today

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