Little-known fruits contain powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant agents

Based on a study conducted by the São Paulo Research Foundation, five fruit trees indigenous to the Atlantic Rainforest have potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant qualities.

box-size-AMAZONIAN-ARTICLES.jpg

According to research, the native Brazilian species e ubajaí (E. Myrcianthes), Bacupari-Miriam (Garcinia Brasiliensis), araçá-Piranga (E. Leitonii), Cereja-do-Rio-Grande (E. involucrata), and Grumixama (E. Brasiliensis), all from the Eugenia genus, have bioactive properties, nutritional value, and act as functional foods. These powerful fruits can combat free radicals, which are highly reactive, unstable, atoms that bind to one another in an organism and cause damage, such as disease and aging. “We knew they could contain a large number of anti-oxidants, just like the well-known berries of the US and Europe, such as the blueberry, blackberry, and strawberry, with which scientists are so familiar,” told Severino Matias Alencar, from the Department of Agroindustry, Food & Nutrition at University of São Paulo’s Luiz de Queiroz Agricultural College (ESALQ-USP). The institution partnered with the University of Campinas’s Piracicaba Dentistry School (FOP-UNICAMP) and the University of the Frontier (UFRO) in Temuco, Chile to conduct the study. “Our native berries proved [to be] even better.” Pedro Rosalen, from FOP-UNICAMP, says that when combating free radicals, diet is tactful. Although neutralization and elimination of free radicals are performed in our bodies, poor alimentation and stress can hinder this natural process. “If so, exogenous elements are required, particularly the intake of foods with anti-oxidant agents, such as flavonoids or anthocyanins from araçá-Piranga, E. Leitonii, and other fruits of the Eugenias,” said Rosalen, coordinator of the project “Bioprospection of novel anti-inflammatory molecules from natural Brazilian native products.” Not only do antioxidants fight signs of aging, but they also work in the prevention of diseases mediated by chronic inflammation, explains Rosalen. “The oxidative action of free radicals leads to the appearance of dependent inflammatory diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, arthritis, obesity and Alzheimer’s. These are silent inflammations, hence the importance of anti-oxidants.”

The researchers evaluated the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of materials extracted from the fruits pulp, seeds, and leaves throughout the study, as well as phenolic compounds. To spur the production of the Chilean native species, guava (Ugni Molinae), researchers spoke in great detail about the fruit throughout the research. Guava produces a vasodilatory action and houses antioxidant properties; both are thought to aid in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. The project also investigated the five fruits anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties for use in the pharmaceutical and food industries. The “most popular” out of the fruits was E. Leitonii, according to Rosalen. “E. Leitonii is an endangered species,” Rosalen said. “Its anti-inflammatory activity far exceeded that of other Eugenias. The action mechanism is also extremely interesting. It occurs spontaneously and right at the start of the inflammation, blocking a specific pathway in the inflammatory process. It also acts on the endothelium of blood vessels, preventing leukocytes from transmigrating to the damaged tissue and reducing exacerbation of the inflammatory process.”

main-qimg-e7a5322295e5102b0770beef7b509943.jpeg

These species are endangered and extremely rare; therefore, two local farms that strive for plant conservation, and reside in the interior of São Paulo State, provided the study samples. One of the farmers owns Brazil’s most significant indigenous fruit collection, which cultivates over 1,300 species, and according to Rosalen, Brazil has roughly 400 Eugenias including many endemic species. “We have an enormous number of native fruit trees with bioactive compounds that could benefit people’s health. They should be studied,” he states. These fruits have pharmacological and economic potential as evidenced by their essentials oils, edible fruits, wood, and their uses as decorative plants and will soon be considered the next superfoods, according to Alencar. “There wasn’t much scientific knowledge about the properties of these native fruits. The idea now, with the results of our study, is for them to be grown by family farmers, increase production scale and be taken up by retailers. Who knows, they could be the next açaí,” said Alencar, referencing to the success of the Amazonian berry, Euterpe oleracea.

Euterpe Oleracea or açaí also contains significant amounts of anti-oxidants and is exported from Brazil to many other countries as a puree.  “Even before the project with UFRO, Rosalen and I already studied native fruit species because we believed they could be a source of excellent food solutions for society,” Alencar stated.

Adapted from: Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo. “Little-known fruits contain powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant agents.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 October 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171031143708.htm.

And….just one more nutritional tip!

Back to class means after-school snacks! Plan healthy snacks along with your weekly meals. Add them to your shopping list to prep for the week ahead.

And…..a little inspiration

prayer_bo0050120189-min.jpg

 

 

Peach & Blueberry Cobbler

3756884.jpg

Cook time: 20 m; Ready In Time: 1 h 15 m*
*All based on your cooking and oven style.

This new and improved healthier version of cobbler will keep your drawers fitting just right and not too tight. In this recipe, a portion of the butter is substituted for canola oil (1), and whole-wheat flour (2) is used in place of all-purpose flour, but don’t panic ladies, it turns out really good! As the cobbler bakes, the tender batter swells around the fruity additions, to give a peach (3) and blueberry (4) topping instead of the biscuit topping that usually laden this dessert. Go ahead and experiment with different fruits, and if you are a cast iron skillet lover, give yours more love by baking and serving the cobbler straight from it. Frozen fruits can also be used in this recipe, and the last healthy alternative used is reduced-fat milk (5).

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup reduced-fat milk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 ripe, firm peaches (roughly 1 pound) pitted and sliced or sub 3 1/2 cups frozen peaches
  • 2 cups (1 pint) fresh blueberries; the same amount if using frozen berries

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF.
  2. Place oil and butter in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet or a 9 X 13″ baking pan, and heat until melted and fragrant; about 5-7 minutes.
  3. While the butter and oil are doing its thing, combine salt, baking powder, and flour in a large bowl. Add vanilla, sugar, milk, and stir to combine.
  4. Add the melted butter mixture to the batter and stir to combine. Pour the batter into the hot pan. Spoon peaches and berries over the batter, and return the pan to the oven.
  5. Bake until the top of the cobbler is browned and the mixture around the fruit is entirely set, approximately 50 min to 1 hour. Remove, and place on a wire rack to cool for at least 15 minutes. Serve warm.

“Nutrition Label:” Serving Size: 1 piece; Per Serving: 196 calories; 9 g fat (3 g sat.); 3 g fiber; 29 g carbohydrates; 3 g protein; 10 mcg folate; 11 mg cholesterol; 18 g sugars; 7 g added sugars ; 317 IU Vitamin A; 6 mg Vitamin C; 80 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 202 mg sodium; 188 mg potassium; Carbohydrate Servings: 2; Exchanges: ½ fruit, 1 ½ other carbohydrate, 1 ½ fat.

Ingredient Healthy Tid-Bits

  1. Canola oil is a monounsaturated oil (which is a healthy oil) that will aid your daily intake of Omega 3s, and these fatty acids are needed for cell growth, maintaining healthy cholesterol, and overall well being. Canola is also a good source of vitamin E, and has less saturated fat than olive oil, although olive is still an excellent choice for helping maintain your healthiness. By substituting 1/2 butter with 1/2 canola oil, you are saving yourself many grams of fat and calories, and you are improving your heart. But, did you know that canola oil is a GMO? Yes, it is a crossbred oil that originates in Canada who developed the oil for means of frying foods, hence its high smoke point.

  2. Wheat-flour has a double whammy! It not only can act as a substitute for all-purpose, but it also throws a much higher nutritional punch, knocking out all-purpose flour! For starters, it houses B vitamins, which are necessary for DNA, energy, fatty acid, and protein synthesis as well as calcium, zinc, vitamin K, and iron, all needed for blood clotting, managing blood sugar, and oxygen transport for blood and tissues. With whole-wheat flour, you will get a good dose of folate, which is crucial for growth and development of tissues, muscles, and organs, and if you need to reduce constipation, bloating, cramping, excess gas and/or diarrhea, look no further than whole-wheat. It contains roughly 30% (7g per 1/2 cup serving) of your daily Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) goal for fiber.

  3. Who doesn’t love a GA peach??? And I mean the fruit, not the native (because it’s a known fact that everyone loves people from the peach state of GA!). Vitamin C, vitamin A, fiber, antioxidants, phenolic acids, potassium, and I am going to stop there on the benefits of peaches and start elaborating on its health benefits. Vitamin C assists with boosting the immune system, and fiber, we know, aids in digestion and keeping us “regular.” For the ladies and gentlemen looking for the healthy skin and eyesight fountain of youth, look no further than vitamin A. Its antioxidant and phenolic acid properties function in maintaining healthy skin and vision and delaying signs of aging, as well as growth inhibition of some cancers (breast). To top off a peach, just one a day may help prevent cardiovascular and bone disease. So, as Steve Miller Band says “love your peaches, shake your tree.”

  4. And the “God” of all antioxidants is berries! Blueberries are one of the best antioxidant foods, with a trail of studies showing its impact on preventing heart disease, fighting cancer, and improving memory power. These little blue gods are another fountain of youth due to their ability to slow the signs of aging. Blueberries are also low in fat, rich in vitamin C and manganese (functions in the central nervous system), and are an excellent source of fiber.

  5. Finally, we have reduced-fat milk, which still contains the same essential nutrients as whole milk; calcium, protein, iodine, but minus the fat and calories. I’ve mentioned calcium, and I am going to stress it again. This mineral has a busy schedule. Not only does it have the duty of aiding blood clotting, but calcium is also on “the hook” for cardiac function, nerve transmission, and smooth muscle contraction, as well as vitamin D’s assistant for bone absorption. Protein, of course, contributes to muscle growth among many other benefits, and iodine aids cognitive function and posses thyroid hormone responsibilities. So, by opting for reduced-fat over whole milk, you are sparing yourself a few more calories and fat, while still getting the nutrients of whole milk.

Still for the brain-Word of the Day

Onerous: A task or responsibility involving a great deal of effort, trouble, or difficulty

And for a little inspiration….

18102017_13860032-min.jpg

So, don’t always rely too much on people!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Classic Potato Salad-Sorry for the Delay 😐

Classic Tato SaladCook time: 30 min

Total time (prep + cook): 45 min (depending on your cooking style and methods)

This classic version adds more of a health punch compared to most original classic potato salads. You still get the creaminess this traditional favorite offers, although you are substituting half of the mayo for yogurt (1). And your fiber and potassium intake bumps up because these taters (2) are “skin” on. If you’re trying to save time and cookware, boil the eggs (4) on top of the potatoes while they are steaming in the steaming basket. Depending on your cooked egg preference, you can leave them in the basket the entire steam time or take them out a few minutes before the taters are tender and done.

Ingredients:

  • 2-1/2 pounds yellow or red potatoes, scrubbed and diced (1/2″ to 1″)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt, DIVIDED
  • 1/2 cup mayo
  • 1/2 cup low-fat plain yogurt
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion (3)
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
  • 1 cup chopped celery (5)

Directions:

  1. Bring 1-2 inches of water to a boil in a large saucepan or pot fitted with a steaming basket. Add potatoes, cover, and cook until tender, 12-15 minutes depending on your stove (while cooking, jump to #2). When done, spread the taters, in a single layer, onto a lined baking sheet (aluminum foil makes an excellent lining and easy for cleanup) and sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt; let cool 15 minutes.
  2. Whisk mayo, yogurt, onion, mustard, pepper, and remaining salt (1/2 tsp) in a large bowl. Once the potatoes are cooled, add them to the mixture along with the eggs and celery; stir to coat.

Serve at room temp or refrigerate until cold. The salad can be made up to 1 day, covered, and refrigerated.

Nutritional Information

Serving Size: ¾ cup; Per Serving: 146 calories; 4 g fat (1 g sat.); 2 g fiber; 24 g carbohydrates, 5 g protein; 27 mcg folate; 40 mg cholesterol; 3 g sugars; 1 g added sugar; 109 IU Vitamin A; 7 mg Vitamin C; 48 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 325 mg sodium; 552 mg potassium

Carbohydrate Servings: 1 ½
Exchanges: 1 ½ starch, 1 fat

Health Benefits:

  1. Low-fat plain yogurt (LFPY) adds calcium, which is needed for teeth and bones, and it is a high-quality protein to help build and repair muscles. LFPY also has live, healthy gut bacteria, which aids in digestion and some who are lactose intolerant may be able to intake small amounts of this yogurt. Still, this healthy substitute stimulates the immune system, and if you are looking to add MORE protein and creaminess, substitute with Greek yogurt.
  2. The skin on taters provides whopping values of fiber to keep you regular, potassium to control blood pressure, and many other vitamins and minerals. Most of the fiber, roughly half, is found in the skin, but beyond the skin, you’ll find most of the vitamin C, which is vital for healthy skin and hair. Potato and its skin also house vitamins B1 and B6; B1 assist in the bodies energy system, and Pyroxidene (B6) is vital for the central nervous system. This carbohydrate contains little to no fat, cholesterol, and calories but it does contain iron, magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu). For healthy blood, our bodies require iron, and for wound healing, Mg, Zn, and Cu take on the job. Last tidbit: Compared to bananas, which have 9g Mg, potatoes out win with 20g Mg, and for a greater nutrient powerhouse, go for the red taters.
  3. Have you ever taken a bite out of a raw onion? If not, I dare you to! Similar to potatoes, onions also contain vitamin C and fiber, along with healthy plant “chemicals” that are thought to prevent some types of cancer, based on studies. Onions are low in fat and calories and again, similar to potatoes, red onions pack a higher nutrient punch.
  4. HUMPTY DUMPTY (Eggs) does NOT spike blood cholesterol, but instead, he does the opposite by raising “good” cholesterol or HDL’s (I call this the happy cholesterol and LDL’s the lowsy cholesterol). All 9 essential amino acids (needed to make proteins) can be found in an egg. Essential indicates that your body cannot make them, they must come from diet. Eggs also provide a healthy dose of Omega 3’s to protect the brain and heart, carotenoids to protect our eyes, and vitamin D to protect our bones.
  5. Did you know that CELERY was once prescribed as an anti-hypertensive many centuries ago? Yeah, I didn’t either. I thought the only nutrition in celery was water, but nope, there is so much more. These gorgeous green, crisp stalks provide vitamin C and act as a diuretic to flush out excess fluid. Yes, ladies, we need our celery! If you suffer from inflammation, celeries properties may help. If you have high cholesterol and blood pressure, phthalates in celery may help lower it, and if you are trying to minimize your cancer risk, coumarins found in the stalks may provide some comfort.

These claims are all based on evidence-based studies; however, PLEASE see your dietitian and doctor before making drastic changes in your diet if you have any of the medical conditions stated above.

3 Ways to Keep Mercury and Arsenic Out of Your Gluten-Free Diet

A few tips on how to avoid these toxins.

 

Image result for 3 Ways to Keep Mercury and Arsenic Out of Your Gluten-Free Diet

Mercury and arsenic are toxic metals that have been associated with a higher risk of neurological problems, cancer, and heart disease. In the past, there have been some headlines relating these metals to a gluten-free diet (g-free), reporting that intake of gluten-free foods may expose one to higher toxic levels. Rice, often substituted in more significant amounts for wheat in gluten-free foods, may store arsenic and mercury due to soil and environmental elements. Therefore, researchers from the University of Illinois set out to examine possible health consequences of a g-free diet vs. a non-gluten free diet. The study ranged from 2009-2014, and participants (73 persons) were chosen if they adhered to a gluten-free diet for those years. Subjects ages varied from 6 years old to 80 years, and participants consented to a blood and urinalysis.

The results showed the participant’s mercury blood levels were 70% higher and urine tests showed twice the arsenic concentrations compared to the non-gluten group. Therefore, the study determined that following a gluten-free diet may result in unexpected health outcomes. Keep in mind; however, the researchers did not examine if rice was the primary cause of metals in the participant’s diets, the study population was small, and the amounts of the metals associated with mercury poisoning and arsenic toxicity were much lower in both participants diets (gluten and non-gluten foods). The research does not mean that going gluten-free will automatically increase your intake of these metals, but it is a good indicator to take caution when choosing g-free foods. Below are three tips on how to optimize your health if gluten-free is the food plan for you.

Eat more whole, fresh foods

Who doesn’t love a slice a pizza (actually, that really sounds good about now!!) or a cookie every now and then? Pizza, cookies, and almost any food these days can be found gluten-free. And what do most of these goods have in common? Many are made with rice and refined flour, as well as added sugar, sodium, and other unwanted additives. Refined flour is stripped of fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants; in other words, it’s highly processed. So, if you are following the “healthy brick road,” some of those g-free treats should be consumed as a treat; only on occasions and not part of the daily staples.

Please note: Simply being gluten-free does not give all products the green light consumption. To ensure clean eating, strive for fresh, whole, minimally processed foods instead of g-free products that contain ingredients you probably cannot pronounce.

Alternate gluten-free foods

Image result for 3 Ways to Keep Mercury and Arsenic Out of Your Gluten-Free Diet

There are various types of gluten-free grains, such as amaranth, teff, corn, millet, sorghum, oats, quinoa, buckwheat, and don’t forget pulses, which include beans, lentils, chickpeas, and peas. Starchy vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, yams, fingerling potatoes, and squash are also g-free. Your goal for meal planning is to choose whole, fresh, natural foods and switch up your selections every now and then. For example, try sweet potato toast and a side of blacks beans with your omelet for breakfast, add lentils or quinoa to your lunch salad, munch on veggies and hummus for your daily snack, and try out spaghetti squash for dinner.

Consume low-mercury seafood

Despite the mercury found in this study, seafood is a significant contributor to a healthy diet. To determine what sea dwellers to avoid, check out the EPA-FDA’s 2017 Advice on Consuming Fish and Shellfish. You should be safe consuming rainbow trout, clams, shrimp, Alaskan salmon, and Atlantic mackerel; however, air on the side of caution with lobster, canned tuna, sea bass, mahi-mahi, crab, and cod, and consume swordfish, king mackerel, grouper, and shark at your own risk. The latter options have shown to contain the highest amounts of mercury.

Just like any eating plan, strive for a healthy balance of the real stuff, don’t be afraid to try new foods, and save those treats for occasions!

Nutrition Nugget

Make time for breakfast! If you skip breakfast, it’s harder to get all the nutrients your body needs throughout the day. Breakfast can be as simple as a piece of fruit and whole grain toast, or low-fat yogurt.

W.O.Day Nugget

Curtal: Shortened, abridged, or curtailed

Inspiration Nugget

Dear God, If I am wrong, right me, if I am lost, guide me, if I start to give up, keep me going. Lead me in light and love.

“Continuing to seek happiness in all the wrong places, people, and things are what drives our cycle of suffering. Yes, we would prefer the luxury life of cozy and secure, the comfortable over the uncomfortable but these safety zones continue to fall apart and offer no true comfort. We cannot keep ourselves enclosed in a cocoon with a limited view of reality and avoid discomfort and pain if true happiness, security, and comfort is what we seek.”

~ Me

 

 

4 Types Of Noodles That Are Healthier Than Past

When it comes to wellness, it’s all about balance, where nutrient ratio, portion size, and mindfulness can keep you on track with your health and fitness goals.

Image result for 4 Types Of Noodles That Are Healthier Than Pasta

So, you’re still allowing “self” to have pasta on occasions, but did you know that giving in to your indulgences, sometimes those “guilty pleasures,” and enjoying a diversity of foods is actually good for the body and soul? Plus, you’ll be more inclined to choose healthier options in the long run when you allow yourself to “give in.” Another plus, if your pasta choice is whole wheat and is roughly a 1/2 cup cooked portion size, then it’s not necessary to consume this yummy carbohydrate only on occasions (unless you have a medical condition that states otherwise). Unfortunately, you can’t eat pasta all day, every day (yeah, I’m still bummed about that!). It’s not exactly healthy if you do, so here are a few options to amp up the nutritional profile, when you’ve already had your days worth of pasta, or you are doing a bit of carb counting.

Edamame Noodles

Edamame isn’t just a great appetizer at an Asian restaurant, it is also a soy-based, protein-rich noodle, and one that pairs well with several flavors, such as pesto dishes (the green color matches perfectly) and a good old-fashioned tomato sauce. And the nutritional benefits? A 1-cup serving of edamame noodles has 25 grams of protein, 210 calories, and 11 grams of fiber. Related image

Chickpea Noodles

Although they’re lower in protein (roughly 14 grams) and fiber (8 grams), they are an excellent alternative, especially for people who don’t tolerate soy or gluten products well. And, you can find these noodles in many grocery stores.

Black Bean

Instead of throwing some black beans on a salad, try eating them in noodle form. With the same nutritional profile as edamame, but with less protein, it’s a good idea to pair these beans with lean meat, tofu, or fish for a more satisfying, muscle-building meal. Black beans are also versatile and high in fiber, so they’ll keep you regular and full. And for a healthy dose of fats, top with avocado and serve at your next Mexican “fiesta” night.

Shirataki Noodles

Did you ever think you could have a zero calorie pasta dish? Well, you can. These noodles are incredibly useful for carb-conscious people, as they have less than one gram per 1 cup serving. Made from konjac flour and water, they are a great way to “fill up,” with few calories. However, to make a complete meal, you will need to add some extra protein and fats. Some good choices? Stir-fry or pair with meat, fish, or tofu to make it more substantial. And, as these are popular in Asian cuisine, you can try a thick, rich peanut sauce to get it to really stick to your bones.

Nutritional Nugget

Vary your protein routine… with seeds! Save your pumpkin seeds. Dry, roast and serve them in salads or enjoy as a crunchy snack.

WODal Nugget

Saudade: (especially with reference to songs or poetry) A feeling of longing, melancholy, or nostalgia that is supposedly characteristic of the Portuguese or Brazilian temperament.

Inspirational Nugget

Fall in love with souls, not faces.

“In the teachings on the four noble truths, suffering is talked about. The first noble truth says simply that it’s part of being human to feel discomfort. If we resist it, the reality and vitality of life become misery. The second noble truth says that this resistance is the fundamental operating mechanism of what we call ego. The third noble truth says that the cessation of suffering is letting go of holding on to ourselves. There is no need to resist being fully alive in this world.”

~Pema ChÖdrÖn

 

 

 

 

 

8 WAYS TO EAT HEALTHY ON THE CHEAP

JUST VISIT YOUR LOCAL HEALTH FOOD STORE, AND THE PROSPECT OF EATING HEALTHIER MAY SEEM WAY, WAY, WAY OUT OF YOUR BUDGET.

Related image

And, at times, it can be. If you trade your favorite packaged foods for healthier versions, you could see your grocery budget go up by at least a 1/3 (it might even double). You can’t stop paying rent, mortgage or bills just so you can eat exotic foods found in the health food store (or I would not suggest you do)…so that dietary change you’re aching to do (and your body might be hurting for it too…) might seem utterly impossible. To start making dietary changes (healthy changes) on a minimal food budget, begin by slowly removing packaged and processed foods from your daily food regimen, and as your willpower and budget allow, incorporate more whole, fresh foods. Before you know it, your grocery cart will be filled to the brim with healthy, whole foods and you will see that the dietary change you were aching to do, has come true!

Yes, in a perfect world this may happen, but then you wake up from your dream and remember that money doesn’t grow on trees! For a majority of us, we have to live on a budget. Sometimes that budget grows and sometimes, well, it shrinks. Just remember not to continue shopping with the “growing budget” when you are on the “shrinking budget” and drain your bank account. So, when you’re not dreaming, and in the real world, how do you eat healthy while on a teeny weeny budget? Is it possible to buy enough groceries to feed two people for a week for less than $20? If you are conservative enough, then yes, it is, and if you do it for long enough where it becomes a skill when you do get that “dream” budget, you will (or hopefully) continue to shop as you did on the “shrinking budget.” So, what are the frugal ways to eat healthier?

1. Make a grocery list.

This simple task can really help reduce a lot of extraneous spending throughout the week. One missing ingredient or staple can mean a few more take-out lunches or dinners. So make it as easy as possible, and have a notepad on your fridge. As soon as you notice a staple is running low (less than a week left), add it to the list. Therefore, when it’s grocery-time, you don’t have to search through the fridge and cupboards to find what’s needed. You will more than likely only need to add some fresh produce and voila, your list is made.

2. Have important staples on hand.

Meal planning can be challenging. You may do great at planning out the first few days only to find yourself throwing something together by the end of the week, with what’s left in the fridge. And this can work, why? Because you already have certain staples on hand, such as:

  • Good oils: Extra virgin olive oil, virgin coconut oil, and sesame oil
  • Frozen veggies: They fill in the gaps if you’re running low at the end of the week
  • Beans: Dried or canned
  • Canned tuna or canned wild salmon
  • Whole grains: Rice, oats, quinoa
  • Condiments: Mustard, soy sauce (low sodium), balsamic vinegar, apple cider vinegar, miso
  • Nut butter’s and hummus (excellent protein options)

Many lovely dinners can be made from these ingredients. So if these are not common staples, you may consider adding them to your new healthy diet repertoire.

3. Buy Seasonally.

A $6 container of strawberries in January or $4/lb for apples in June is not budget friendly. Buying “in season” can really reduce your grocery bill and your body will love it. Buy berries and tomatoes in the summer and freeze for use all year long.

4. Buy Cheaper Cuts of Meat.

This will really stretch your budget, and it might also allow you to buy organic or free-range instead of conventionally grown meats. Buy bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs or legs instead of boneless, skinless chicken breasts. Buy stewing beef instead of tenderloin and pull out your crockpot that’s collecting dust (or find one at a thrift shop). It will make that tougher cut absolutely delicious.

5. Enjoy More Vegetarian Meals.

This one step can save you SO much money, and it can be better for the planet! Beans and lentils are significantly cheaper sources of protein than meat. If you’re a heavy meat eater, try just 1 or 2 vegetarian lunches or dinners and watch your grocery bill go down!

6. Buy Whole Foods.

Instead of packaged or processed “healthy” foods. The most expensive meals at health food stores are the healthier versions of packaged foods (cereal, mac ‘n’ cheese, pizza, veggie burgers, etc.). Buy whole foods and try some new recipes. Use these packaged foods as an occasional treat.

7. Buy Grains and Beans in Bulk.

Bulk stores or bulk sections at your favorite health food store is a great place to save lots of money on your grocery bill. This is especially true for the more expensive grains like quinoa. Organic spices are also a great find in a bulk section; organic quality for the price of conventional.

8. Cook at Home.

If you’re currently eating out or even just buying coffee a few times per week, keep track of how much you’re spending. $10 here and $30 there can add up over a month, and this extra cash can really go far at the grocery store. Once you know how much you’re spending, you can budget for take-out or coffee treats you really want and put the rest into your grocery budget. If your favorite treat is wine (then we really need to get together for a glass!), enjoy a few glasses a week but ensure to spend any extra money on food quality first, then the booze. Your body undoubtedly prefers a good breakfast omelet over a hangover. And once you have high-quality foods and there is still some “bucks” left, then go ahead and buy that extra bottle!food-plate-morning-breakfast.jpg

If YOU have additional tips and tricks on how to stretch your grocery budget, please send me your ideas and share them in the comments! Happy food budgeting.

Adapted from: Lisa Kilgour, nutritionist

Nutrition Nugget

Make it easy! Keep a bowl of fruit on your kitchen table or countertop. It makes it easier to choose a healthy snack when it’s in plain sight!

WOD Nugget

Picayune: A small coin of little value, especially a 5-cent piece.

Inspirational Nugget 

Don't be a beggar of love, be a donor of love, beautiful people are not always good, but good people are always beautiful.

“This path entails uncovering three qualities of being human, three basic qualities that have always been with us but perhaps have gotten buried and been almost forgotten. These qualities are natural intelligence, natural warmth, and natural openness. If we are not obscuring our intelligence with anger, self-pity or craving, we know what will help and what will make things worse. Natural warmth is our shared capacity to love, to have empathy, to have a sense of humor. It is also our capacity to feel gratitude and appreciation and tenderness. The third quality of basic goodness is natural openness, the spaciousness of our skylike minds. We can connect with that openness at any time. For instance, right now, for three seconds, just stop reading and pause.”

-Pema ChÖdrÖn

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Eat Beets

These sweet, earthy root veggies are packed with surprising health benefits.

Related image

You can’t beat beets! After years of being relegated to the recesses of the salad bar buffet next to the shredded cheese and buttered croutons, beets are enjoying their much-deserved place at the center stage of a healthy diet. They’re not only chock-full of essential everyday nutrients like B vitamins, iron, manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium, these ruby gems also are a goldmine of health-boosting nutrients that you may not get anywhere else. Check out these great and surprising things that happen to your body when you eat beets.

Blood pressure improves

Beets are rich in nitrates, which the body converts to nitric oxide, a compound that relaxes and dilates blood vessels, turning them into superhighways for your nutrient- and oxygen-rich blood. That means better circulation and possibly lower blood pressure. A very small study from 2012 found that 13 men who drank just one glass of beet juice temporarily lowered their systolic blood pressure by an average of 4 to 5 points. (Note: the study was funded by a beet juice manufacturer.) Another study published in Hypertension in 2008 (which didn’t receive funding from beet-juice makers) found that those who drank the red root juice had a 10 mm Hg drop in blood pressure and less blood clotting three hours later, compared to those who drank water.

Your heart disease risk may drop

Beets also have a potentially positive impact on your blood pressure. They are rich in a plant alkaloid called betaine, as well as the B-vitamin folate, which together delivers a one-two punch for lowering blood levels of homocysteine, which in high concentrations increases your risk for artery damage and heart disease.

You may improve your stamina

When elite athletes pee in a cup for a drug test, the color might be crimson. Why? Because lots of athletes eat beets, and beets contain pigments that turn urine pink.  Athletes also know that research has suggested that nitrates boost endurance performance. In one study, cyclists who drank beet juice could pedal 15% longer in a time trial to exhaustion. It takes approximately three to five beets (depending on their size, which varies widely) to get a performance boost, says study author Andy Jones, Ph.D., dean of research in the College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter. “Peak nitrate levels occur two to three hours after you eat or drink them,” he says. So time your intake accordingly if you want to crush your 5K.

Your brain may work better

Nitric oxide relaxes and dilates your blood vessels, which in turn increases blood flow to the brain, resulting in better brain function. This is particularly important as we age, as research finds that our capacity to generate nitric oxide diminishes as we get older, along with our brain’s energy metabolism and neuron activity, so give your mind a boost with beets. In one small 2010 study, 14 older men and women (average age of 74) who ate a high-nitrate diet, including beet juice, for two days enjoyed more blood flow to the frontal lobe of their brains, than when they ate a low-nitrate diet. The frontal lobe is a region known to be involved with executive functioning skills, such as focus, organization, and attention to detail,

Your liver will be lighter

Your liver does the heavy work of cleaning your blood and “detoxing” your body. You can lighten its load with a daily serving of beets. Research shows that betaine, an amino acid found in beets (as well as spinach and quinoa) can help prevent and reduce the accumulation of fat in the liver. Animal studies show that rats given beet juice have higher levels of detoxifying enzymes in their bloodstream. Research on people with diabetes shows that betaine improves liver function, slightly decreases cholesterol, and reduces liver size.

You may be better at fighting chronic diseasesRelated image

Beets are also rich in betalains, a class of potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatories that battle free radical-and inflammation-related chronic diseases like heart disease, obesity, and possibly cancer. Research suggests that betacyanin, the pigment that gives beets its pretty purple hue may help protect against everyday carcinogens. It has also shown promise against laboratory-grown breast cancer cells and is currently being investigated as a cancer-fighter.

You become regular

“One way to beat irregularity and constipation is by eating fiber-rich foods like beets,” says Leslie Bonci, RD, a sports nutritionist at Pittsburgh-based company Active Eating Advice. One cup of beets delivers about 4 grams of dietary fiber, mainly insoluble fiber, which helps reduce the risk of constipation, hemorrhoids, and diverticulitis. The betaine found in beets has also been shown to improve digestion. Just take note, your pee isn’t the only thing beets turn pink. Don’t be alarmed if you see crimson-colored stools 24 to 72 hours following a meal heavy in beets.

You can’t beat beets!

Nutrition Nugget

Include veggies for breakfast! Try adding chopped mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach, or peppers to scrambled eggs or a breakfast wrap.

WOD Nugget

Eschew: Deliberately avoid using; abstain from

Inspiration Nugget

When my arms can't reach people, who are close to my heart, I always hug them with my prayers.