How to Beat Back Cravings When Just Seeing Sweets Makes You Lust for Them

Do you get “weak in the willpower” when office donuts arrive? Ever scarfed down that last slice or two of your favorite cake, or a homemade brownie, or that leftover Halloween candy that your colleagues keep bringing in to work after you’ve checked your hunger level and told self, “nope, not hungry at all?” Then, I’m going to assume that you are well aware that sweat treats, when insight, can lead to severe sugar cravings. Foods that are bathed primarily in fat, sugar, flavors, and additives are known as hyper-palatable, and these foods release dopamine, a neurotransmitter released when neurons are triggered. Dopamine is the driving factor to your consumption of that sweet treat staring at you.

Related image

“A lot of people don’t make the connection that there’s something physiological happening when they see hyper-palatable foods,” says Eliza Kingsford, a psychotherapist. “This is not a signal that your body is hungry or needs nutrients; instead, it is a response to dopamine.” It is possible; however, to control cravings. Walking past the cookie jar or the ice cream isle can be bearable with a few tips and tricks.

Step 1: Keep moving

Cut ties with those yummy desserts. Instead of watching your favorite Food Network show, put in a non-food movie. See caramel and chocolate while surfing the net? Click on the link to pay bills in your favorites bar. The candy jar at work? Don’t walk past it and if you have to, phone a friend.

“Sometimes it’s as simple as out of sight, out of mind,” says Keri Gans, RD, author of The Small Change Diet. “Distancing yourself can lessen the craving.”

Step 2: Distract yourself

You made it out alive after passing the cookie jar and not giving in, but you still have a sweet tooth craving, so what do you do? You set the mind on anything besides sugar, suggests Gans. Phone a friend, study something (there is always new research to be learned), brush your teeth. “You want to do anything besides sitting there and thinking about the food,” says Gans.

Step 3: Get mindful

It is inevitable that situations and events will arise where you can’t turn or run away from food, like a mad person; this is when mindfulness comes in handy. Take a breath, slow down, and get in touch with how the craving feels. Is the desire really what you want? The choice is yours. Image result for How to Beat Back Cravings When Just Seeing Sweets Makes You Lust for Them

Step 4: Relish every bite

Unfortunately, this step doesn’t work for everyone. If you’re like me and have ever devoured an entire pint or more of cookie dough ice cream or any ice cream or any sweet bite, then you are likely in the “unfortunate” category. However, if you have the willpower to stop after that small bite, I truly admire you, and you are exempt from the “unfortunate” class! For the rest of us, try to keep your attention on the mouthfeel and sweetness. If you want to make it more pleasurable, shout from the rooftops, “I love how the frosting and whipped cream melts on my tongue, and that cake is so moist!”

Step 5: Set realistic guidelines

Ok, you know you’re heading into a temptation zone, like Halloween; however, surrendering yourself to the candy jar or the Halloween stash brought in by the youngens probably won’t work. So, make a few rules, such as one small piece daily and don’t veer from that rule.

Step 6: Make a negative association

Are you triggered by fluffy pancakes or melting ice cream sandwich ads on TV? Consider the reality behind those commercials, says Kingsford: “There are billions of dollars poured into the marketing industry to elicit food cravings,” she says. “But what you see in those images is sprayed-on lacquer, crazy chemicals to make foods melt a certain way, dyes and markers, and weird lighting. Would you eat that? No, that’s disgusting.”

Step 7: Reflect on how you will feel if you give in

Ask yourself,  “Do I really want this sugar bomb?” If yes, then ask, “Will I feel shame and guilt if I eat it?” If you are still stuck, go back to question 1 “Do I really, really want this sweet goody?” After you have made it this far into the thought process, your mind is ready to move to the next subject and say “toodles” to that dessert.

The finale: Keep a healthier version of a favorite treat on hand.

If your mouth waters every time your co-worker opens a bag of M&Ms, try packing your own clean treat, so you don’t feel deprived, such as a granola bar, yogurt, fruit. And if it’s baked goods you crave, bring a homemade version of the “clean” treat sweetened with maple syrup instead of refined sugar.

You can do! Have faith and believe in yourself and know one set back is not a lifetime of regret. You are human so live life and enjoy it! You never know when the next challenge will hit.

Nutritional Nugget

Take grains on the go! Popcorn, whole-grain rice cakes, and crackers are convenient, on-the-go snacks. Be sure to make at least half your grains whole.

WODal Nugget

Invigorate: To give strength and/or energy to something or someone

Inspirational Nugget

And every day, the world will drag you by the hand, yelling, "This is important! And this is important! And this is important! You need to worry about this! And this! And this!" And each day, it's up to you to yank your hand back, put it on your heart and say, "No. This is what's important." - Iain Thomas, I Wrote This For You

“Pleasant and unpleasant situations are both part of our lives that is inevitable.”

~ Me

 

A dietary supplement dampens the brain hyperexcitability seen in seizures or epilepsy

Researchers have found that inducing a biochemical alteration in brain proteins via the dietary supplement glucosamine was able to rapidly dampen that pathological hyperexcitability in rat and mouse models. These results represent a potentially novel therapeutic target for the treatment of seizure disorders, and they show the need to better understand the physiology underlying these neural and brain circuit changes.

Image result for A dietary supplement dampens the brain hyperexcitability seen in seizures or epilepsy

Seizure disorders, including epilepsy, are associated with pathological hyperexcitability in brain neurons. Unfortunately, there are limited available treatments that can prevent this hyperexcitability. However, the *University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found that inducing a biochemical alteration in brain proteins via the dietary supplement glucosamine was able to rapidly dampen that pathological hyperexcitability in rat and mouse models.

 

These results represent a potentially novel therapeutic target for the treatment of seizure disorders, and they show the need to better understand the physiology underlying these neural and brain circuit changes. Proteins are the workhorses of living cells, and their activities are tightly and rapidly regulated in responses to changing conditions. Adding or removing a phosphoryl group of proteins is a well-known regulator of many proteins, and it is estimated that human proteins may have as many as 230,000 sites for phosphorylation. A lesser-known regulation comes from the addition or removal of N-acetylglucosamine to proteins, which is usually controlled by glucose, the primary fuel for neurons. Several years ago, neuroscientist Lori McMahon, Ph.D., professor of cell, developmental and integrative biology at UAB, found out from her colleague John Chatham, D.Phil., a UAB professor of pathology and a cardiac physiologist, that brain cells had the second-highest amounts of proteins with N-acetylglucosamine, or O-GlcNAcylation, in the body.

At the time, very little was known about how O-GlcNAcylation might affect brain function, so McMahon and Chatham started working together. In 2014, McMahon and Chatham, in a study led by graduate student Erica Taylor and colleagues, reported that acute increases in protein O-GlcNAcylation caused long-term synaptic depression, a reduction in neuronal synaptic strength, in the hippocampus of the brain. This was the first time acute changes in O-GlcNAcylation of neuronal proteins were shown to directly change synaptic function. Since neural excitability in the hippocampus is a crucial feature of seizures and epilepsy, they hypothesized that acutely increasing protein O-GlcNAcylation might dampen the pathological hyperexcitability associated with these brain disorders.

That turned out to be the case, as reported in the Journal of Neuroscience study, “Acute increases in protein O-GlcNAcylation dampen epileptiform activity in the hippocampus.” The study was led by corresponding author McMahon and first author Luke Stewart, a doctoral student in the Neuroscience Theme of the Graduate Biomedical Sciences Program. Stewart is co-mentored by McMahon and Chatham. “Our findings support the conclusion that protein O-GlcNAcylation is a regulator of neuronal excitability, and it represents a promising target for further research on seizure disorder therapeutics,” they wrote in their research significance statement. The researchers caution that the mechanism underlying the dampening is likely to be complicated.

Research details

Glucose, the primary fuel for neurons, also controls the levels of protein O-GlcNAcylation on proteins. However, high levels of the dietary supplement glucosamine, or an inhibitor of the enzyme that removes O-GlcNAcylation, leads to rapid increases in O-GlcNAc levels. In experiments with hippocampal brain slices treated to induce stable and ongoing hyperexcitability, UAB researchers found that an acute rise in protein O-GlcNAcylation significantly decreased the sudden bursts of electrical activity known as epileptiform activity in area CA1 of the hippocampus. An increased protein O-GlcNAcylation in normal cells also protected against a later induction of drug-induced hyperexcitability.

The effects were seen in slices treated with both glucosamine and an inhibitor of the enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc groups. They also found that treatment with glucosamine alone for as short a time as 10 minutes was able to dampen ongoing drug-induced hyperexcitability. In common with the long-term synaptic depression provoked by increased O-GlcNAcylation, the dampening of hyperexcitability required the GluA2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, which is a glutamate-gated ion channel responsible for fast synaptic transmission in the brain. This finding suggested a conserved mechanism for the two changes provoked by increased O-GlcNAcylation — synaptic depression and dampening of hyperexcitability.

The researchers also found that the spontaneous firing of pyramidal neurons in another region of hippocampus, area CA3, was reduced by increased O-GlcNAcylation in normal brain slices and in slices with drug-induced hyperexcitability. This reduction in spontaneous firing of CA3 pyramidal neurons likely contributes to decreased hyperexcitability in area CA1 since the CA3 neurons directly excite those in CA1. Similar to the findings for brain slices, mice that were treated to increase O-GlcNAcylation before getting drug-induced hyperexcitability had fewer of the brain activity spikes associated with epilepsy that are called interictal spikes. Several drug-induced hyperexcitable mice had convulsive seizures during the experiments, this occurred in both the increased O-GlcNAcylation mice and the control mice. Brain activity during the seizures differed between these two groups: The peak power of the brain activity for the mice with increased O-GlcNAcylation occurred at a lower frequency, as compared with the control mice.

*I am very proud to say UA (though UA Tuscaloosa) is my graduate program home!

Adapted from: Luke T. Stewart, Anas U. Khan, Kai Wang, Diana Pizarro, Sandipan Pati, Susan C. Buckingham, Michelle L. Olsen, John C. Chatham, Lori L. McMahon. Acute Increases in Protein O-GlcNAcylation Dampen Epileptiform Activity in HippocampusThe Journal of Neuroscience, 2017; 37 (34): 8207 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0173-16.2017

Nutrition Daily Nugget…..and a bit of wine! 

Watch out for added sugars! They add extra calories but no helpful nutrients. Sugar-sweetened beverages and soft drinks are the number one source of added sugars for most of us.

AND….if you are looking for some excellent wine selections, check out Bright Cellars. The link is also on the right side of my blog for future reference.

Daily Inspiration Nugget

Never stop believing in hope. Miracles happen everyday.

 

 

The Best Way To Help Your Child With Their Weight & Body Image + Chaos

276e3ab26911ee2364ed25dde53b3804.jpg

If you have kids in your life, you’re probably already aware that body image challenges start early. Numerous studies have shown that even elementary school children, especially girls, believe they need to change something about their body, whether it’s their weight, their hair, their freckles, or something else. It can be heartbreaking to watch the children we care about struggling with these issues, and so many grown-ups want to know what they can do to help. As it turns out, there IS one thing that we, as adults, can do to create an environment that truly supports our kids’ development of a healthy, positive body image. It’s something we actually have a lot of control over, and best of all, when we start doing this, it will immediately make our own lives better, too.

I would like to share my thoughts on the best way to help children with their weight and their body image. Though I do not have credentials behind my name….yet (another six months and I will!), I have struggled with anorexia nervosa for almost 20 years. I have been in recovery for four years so I give myself a bit of credibility when it comes to this subject. I also do a ton of research!

We live in a time when so many people, young and old, are experiencing an epidemic of body hate and body dissatisfaction. You can read the statistics. Nine out of 10 women polled are hitting on their bodies, and 40% of girls, three to six years old, are already dieting. They’re hating on their body. They’re wanting to change their body parts.

This is crazy! This is the kind of challenge that cuts me to the core….and I hope yours as well.

Hating our body, judging it, and believing that it’s unlovable in some way is the royal road to misery and an unhappy life.

Think about it. When we’re born into this world, watch a baby. They’re not sitting there worried about how they’re looking or running around naked or if they’ve got little bits of body fat here and there. Babies and infants are in love with their physiology. It’s just all one. It’s pleasure. It’s play. However, so many people are struggling in silence with self-defeating thoughts about their own physical form. We’ve got to change that.

An unhappy and unresolved body image keeps us small in our sense of self. It limits our personal growth. It stops our best creativity, and it leaves us far short of the beautiful potential that we are born with. Body hate shuts down the soul. It ruins us. It’s a soul crusher!

If you’re a parent or you have kids in your life and you really want to help the child, especially if you’re a parent, then you want to give them the best chance of a loving relationship with their body….OR at least I hope you do! An unhappy body image these days often starts at a young age. However, there is one strategy that will help you succeed in such a brilliant and beautiful way:

Heal your own relationship with your body!

That’s it. Work on you. Work on your relationship with your body. Get to a place, please, as fast as you can where you forgive your own imperfections and where you let go of your own self-criticism. Stop the fight. Just stop the war because your children, our children pick up on who we are. Children are brilliant observers. They’re not good interpreters, but they’re brilliant observers. They will observe mommy, daddy hating on their own body. They’ll feel it. They’ll absorb it through the airwaves.

In a way, this is the beauty of our young ones. They want to be like us, and they will be like us. Therefore, it is best to look in the mirror and start to work on SELF. It is going to save your kids so much heartache and unnecessary waste of life energy as they get older.

SO AGAIN!!…….the greatest gift you can give your kids is to do your own work and do it now and stop the nonsense in your own head! Here’s how you start: Call a cease-fire on self-attack, and mean it! Just wake up and say cease-fire! Consciously choose to begin to love yourself in small ways. It’s a practice. You’ve got to practice every day.

Every day practice gratitude in some way, shape, or form, for the body that you’ve been given. I know you’ve got complaints about it and this and that and all that. However, balance out all those crazy complaints with some gratitude. Find ways every day to affirm love for your body.

Honestly, it is as simple as that because when you do work on yourself, you save future generations from pain and suffering. However, I know for some…..it isn’t that simple. Your “leading by example” will uplift them in ways that they’ll never know, and when you do that, when you do your work on self so your kids don’t have to finish up that work, we create such a better planet and such a better environment for all of us to thrive in. This is the magic of the world!

 

Chaos: Emily Rosen

 

Nutrition Tip of the Day

Enjoy fish high in omega-3 fatty acids. Oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, trout and albacore tuna are good choices!

 

Daily Inspiration 

new-1045954_1920.jpg

 

 

Premature infants may get metabolic boost from mom’s breast milk

74b8a9ab306ff023626e43999933e54e--a-call-mom-baby.jpg

The breast milk of mothers with premature babies have different amounts of microRNA than that of mothers with babies born at term, which may help premature babies catch up in growth and development, according to researchers. In a study, researchers compared the breast milk of mothers with babies born prematurely between 28 and 37 weeks gestation and at term after 38 weeks. They examined whether there were differences in the composition of the breast milks’ microRNAs, snippets of RNA that affect gene expression and can be passed to the infant.

“We found that there are differences in these microRNA profiles, and that the majority of the altered microRNAs influence metabolism,” said Molly Carney, medical student in the Penn State College of Medicine. “If those microRNAs are being transferred to the infant, that could potentially impact how the newborn processes energy and nutrients.” The researchers said the results, recently published in Pediatric Research, could help better match babies with donated breast milk and give insight into how to develop better infant formula.

Babies born prematurely are at risk for a host of problems, including failure to thrive and neurodevelopmental delays. They also tend to be born at a lower weight than term infants. Because of these issues, premature babies have different nutritional needs than babies born at term.

Previous research has established that the macronutrients, fats, sugars (carbohydrates) and proteins, in the breast milk of mothers with premature babies are customized to meet the unique needs of these infants. However, although researchers have suspected that microRNAs in breast milk have a role in infant health and development, no study has specifically looked at whether microRNAs differed between premature and term breast milk. The researchers collected 36 samples of breast milk from mothers with infants born at term and 31 samples from mothers with infants born prematurely. They then processed the samples in a lab, extracted the microRNAs and compared them to the human genome to pinpoint the differences between premature and term breast milk.

After the analysis, the researchers identified nine microRNAs that were significantly different in the premature breast milk. They found that these microRNAs target metabolic processes and may help regulate gastrointestinal function and energy use in premature babies. Steven Hicks, assistant professor of pediatrics in the Penn State College of Medicine, said the results may help explain why premature infants tend to do better when breast-fed by their mothers.

“We know that babies born prematurely have better health outcomes with breast milk than with formula, and our results may explain some of these health benefits associated with breast-feeding,” Hicks said. “The unique microRNA profiles that we found in premature breast milk seem well suited to premature infants, because they target metabolic pathways that could spark catch-up growth.” For example, microRNAs found in premature breast milk block both ADRB3 and NR3C1 gene expression, both of which negatively affect adipogenesis, or fat storage. Blocking these pathways could help boost fat production in premature babies that are having difficulties gaining weight.

Hicks said the results could have several applications, including matching babies with donated breast milk. “For a variety of reasons, babies who are born preterm often rely on donated breast milk,” Hicks said. “Oftentimes, that milk comes from a mother who gave birth at term, and has been breast-feeding for months. That milk may not be optimal for a 32-week premature infant who was born two days ago.”

Hicks also said the findings could lead to opportunities to create better baby formula in the future. “MicroRNAs are an epigenetic material that is made by our bodies and is not present in formula. So even though formula is made to mirror the nutritional components of breast milk — carbohydrates, lipids and proteins — it doesn’t have any of these epigenetic factors,” Hicks said. “It is possible to create microRNAs in a lab and put them in formula. This approach might help bridge the health gap we see between formula- and breast-fed infants.” The researchers said the study helps reinforce that breast milk has multiple nutritional benefits, and may be adapted to individual infant’s needs.

Adapted from: Penn State. (2017, September 14). Premature infants may get metabolic boost from mom’s breast milk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 15, 2017 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170914084048.htm

Nutrition Tip of the Day

Have a vegetable at breakfast! Most people save their veggies for dinner, but it’s perfectly healthy to think outside the cereal bowl and veg out at breakfast, with veggies. For example, add a sliced tomato to your cheese sandwich or some mushrooms to your eggs.

Daily Inspiration 

ama-dablam-2064522_128360-min.jpg

 

 

Infant gut microbes linked to allergy, asthma risk

Microbiome_QuoteBox_thumb.png

Our digestive tracts are home to trillions of microbes—including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. This microbial community, known as the microbiota, plays a role in illness and health. Scientists have suspected that infants’ gut microbiota could influence how their immune systems develop. A team led by Drs. Christine C. Johnson at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit and Susan V. Lynch at the University of California, San Francisco, set out to examine the relationship between an infant’s gut microbiota and subsequent development of allergy and asthma. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). Results appeared online on September 12, 2016 in Nature Medicine.

The researchers analyzed stool samples from almost 300 infants, ages 1 to 11 months. The infants were part of a large, diverse study group born in and around Detroit between 2003 and 2007. The children and their families were followed over time to better understand how early-life exposure to environmental factors might affect the risk for allergy and asthma.

To determine the composition of gut microbes in the stool samples, the scientists examined sequence variation within ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a central component of the protein-manufacturing machinery of all living cells. The investigators found that the infants formed 3 groups characterized by distinct bacterial and fungal gut microbiota. Blood samples obtained from the infants at 2 years of age were tested for sensitivity to allergens. The researchers found that the 3 microbiota groups had substantially different risks for allergen sensitivity. The “high-risk” group had a relatively lower abundance of certain bacteria (such as Bifidobacterium, Akkermansia, and Faecalibacterium) and a higher level of some fungi (such as Candida and Rhodotorula). This high-risk microbiota group was also more likely to be diagnosed with asthma at 4 years of age. The relationship between gut microbiota and allergy and asthma held when the researchers controlled for other factors associated with allergic disease, such as breast feeding and dog allergens in the home.

The team analyzed metabolites in some of the infant’s stool samples. They found extensive differences among the 3 groups. Notably, the high-risk group had greater levels of metabolites that promote inflammation.

The scientists next exposed immune cells from healthy adults to metabolites extracted from the infant’s stool samples. The high-risk group’s samples increased the proportion of allergy-promoting immune cells and production of interleukin-4, an allergy-associated cell-signaling protein. These samples also reduced T-regulatory cells, a key group of immune cells necessary to prevent allergic responses. The team identified a lipid found at high levels in the highest risk group, called 12,13-DiHOME, that could suppress T-regulatory cells.

“We have been working for over a decade trying to figure out why some children get asthma and allergies and some don’t,” Johnson says. “It seems that the microbial communities within the body could be the keystone to understanding this and a number of different immune diseases.” “Humans have co-evolved with microbes, and as a result we rely on their genomes for a range of critical functions. Understanding the basis of human-microbial development may prove critical to unraveling the basis of allergy and asthma and to developing preventative therapeutic strategies,” Lynch adds.

 Neonatal gut microbiota associates with childhood multisensitized atopy and T cell differentiation. Fujimura KE, Sitarik AR, Havstad S, Lin DL, Levan S, Fadrosh D, Panzer AR, LaMere B, Rackaityte E, Lukacs NW, Wegienka G, Boushey HA, Ownby DR, Zoratti EM, Levin AM, Johnson CC, Lynch SV. Nat Med. 2016 Sep 12. doi: 10.1038/nm.4176. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 27618652.

Nutrition Tip of the Day

Grocery shop with a friend so you can split large packages and take advantage of volume discounts such as, club packs or ‘buy one, get one free’ deals.

Daily Inspiration 

pexels-photo-24558-min.jpg

 

 

5 Whole Grains to Keep Your Family Healthy

large

Next time you go shopping, help keep your family healthy by choosing whole grains over refined grains. Whole grains (such as buckwheat, brown rice, hominy and oatmeal) are more nutritious than refined grains because they contain the fiber-rich outer bran layer, the nutrient-packed germ and the starchy endosperm. Refined grains (such as white bread, white pasta and white rice) contain mostly the endosperm. In the past, whole grains were thought to provide mostly fiber to promote digestive and heart health, but newer research has revealed that they provide additional vitamins and minerals, plus high levels of antioxidants and other healthy plant-based nutrients. No matter which whole grain you prefer, make sure the ingredient list includes whole grains or that the label reads “100-percent whole grain.”

Amaranth

Gluten-free amaranth is considered a complete protein because it contains all of the essential amino acids in proportions that humans need, including lysine which other grains tend to lack. Additionally, it’s a good source of minerals such as iron, magnesium and zinc, plus it offers some calcium and potassium. In South America, amaranth is popped like miniature popcorn. “Most kids love pasta, and amaranth can be used as a substitute for couscous or orzo,” said Nancy Z. Farrell, MS, RDN, who is a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Use amaranth flour to make tasty baked products like zucchini bread, carrot cake or blueberry muffins and pancakes.”

Barley

Barley is a fiber powerhouse. Hulled barley has more fiber-rich bran than pearled barley, “but both contain beta-glucan soluble fiber that slows the absorption of glucose, and helps to keep blood sugar levels stable, thus providing sustained energy throughout the day,” says Farrell. Barley also contains selenium, a powerful antioxidant. Barley is great added to soups or used to make a pilaf. It can even be made into a hot breakfast cereal. Hulled barley will take more time to cook than pearled barley, about 50 to 60 minutes.

Oats

Oats also contain beta-glucan fiber which can lower cholesterol and help strengthen the immune system. Oats boast polyphenol compounds that have antioxidant and anti-itch properties. Besides the age-old favorite oatmeal for breakfast, oats can be added as a binder to meatloaf and burgers. Oats also work well in baked goods including oatmeal cookies, as a crunchy topping to crisps and crumbles, and even in casserole dishes.

Quinoa

Like amaranth, quinoa contains all nine essential amino acids and is gluten-free. Moreover, quinoa is an excellent source of magnesium and a good source of zinc, iron and folate. “Quinoa is easy to make,” said Farrell. “While not required, toasting quinoa before boiling it in liquid enhances flavor, as does cooking it in vegetable or chicken broth.” Quinoa can be made in a rice cooker, as well. Before cooking, use a fine mesh strainer to rinse the quinoa and remove the outer coating, called saponin, which can give the quinoa a bitter taste. Quinoa is fun for kids because it pops in the mouth when chewed and comes in several colors: beige, red, black and even purple. Mix quinoa with beans or nuts for a tasty side dish, or add to salads and stir-fries.

Teff

Of these five grains, gluten-free teff is highest in calcium and protein. Teff also is a rich source of fiber, iron and thiamin. Teff grains are tiny and have a mild nutty flavor. It’s an indispensable grain in Ethiopia where it’s used to make the traditional flat bread, injera, and it’s grown in the United States in Idaho. Cook the grain into a creamy hot cereal or a tasty polenta. You can also mix teff with veggies for a side dish.

Adapted from: Andrea Giancoli, MPH, RD

Nutrition Tip of the Day

Keep tomatoes on the counter, out of direct sunlight, so they stay fresh and flavourful.

Daily Inspiration 

39691-245

 

 

Preschoolers benefit from peanut allergy therapy

Clinical-trialencouraging-news-for-kids-with-peanut-allergy-blog-title

Peanuts are one of the most common causes of food allergies. Allergic reactions to peanuts can be mild, but they may also be severe and lead to a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Peanut allergy usually starts in early childhood and lasts a lifetime. Avoiding exposure is the best way to prevent an allergic reaction. However, steering clear of peanuts is difficult, since it can be in foods you may not suspect.

Recent studies have shown that an experimental treatment called oral immunotherapy can reduce allergies to some foods, including peanuts. A team of researchers led by Dr. Wesley Burks at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill tested the approach as an early intervention in preschool-age children newly diagnosed with peanut allergy. The work was partly supported by the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). Results were published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology on August 10, 2016.

The team enrolled 40 young children (9 to 36 months old) newly diagnosed with peanut allergy. The treatment involved eating small, gradually increasing amounts of peanut protein each day. Participants were randomly assigned to either a high-dose (target daily dose of 3,000 milligrams peanut protein) or a low-dose regimen (target dose of 300 milligrams). Data from a group of 154 peanut-allergic children who had received standard care and avoided peanuts were used as a control.

Nearly all treated participants experienced some side effects, such as abdominal pain. These were generally mild and required little or no treatment. Three people withdrew from the study because of adverse effects. Two others withdrew for other reasons.

After receiving treatment for 29 months on average, participants ate a peanut-free diet for 4 weeks and then were evaluated for their ability to eat 5 grams of peanut protein. Almost 80% of treated participants had no allergic response. There was no significant difference between the low-dose and high-dose arms. In comparison, only 4% of the control group successfully introduced peanuts into their diet. These results are substantially better than those in older children who had a longer duration of peanut allergy.

“This study provides critical evidence supporting the safety and effectiveness of peanut oral immunotherapy in treating young children newly diagnosed with peanut allergy,” says NIAID food allergy expert Dr. Marshall Plaut. Researchers continue to monitor the participants to assess how long the treatment effects may last. Scientists note that this experimental therapy is still being tested in clinical trials and should be given only under medical supervision. Consult with a doctor before giving peanut products to an allergy-prone child.

Vickery BP, Berglund JP, Burk CM, Fine JP, Kim EH, Kim JI, Keet CA, Kulis M, Orgel KG, Guo R, Steele PH, Virkud YV, Ye P, Wright BL, Wood RA, Burks AW. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 Aug 4. pii: S0091-6749(16)30531-0. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2016.05.027. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 27522159.

Nutrition Tip of the Day

Having trouble getting kids to eat vegetables? Try changing the shape. Grate carrots, make cucumber ribbons with a peeler, and cut peppers into stars using scissors. Give them creative names too — kids eat more power peas and X-ray vision carrots than plain ol’ peas and carrots.

Daily Inspiration 

35477-salt-and-light.png.jpeg