Classic Potato Salad-Sorry for the Delay 😐

Classic Tato SaladCook time: 30 min

Total time (prep + cook): 45 min (depending on your cooking style and methods)

This classic version adds more of a health punch compared to most original classic potato salads. You still get the creaminess this traditional favorite offers, although you are substituting half of the mayo for yogurt (1). And your fiber and potassium intake bumps up because these taters (2) are “skin” on. If you’re trying to save time and cookware, boil the eggs (4) on top of the potatoes while they are steaming in the steaming basket. Depending on your cooked egg preference, you can leave them in the basket the entire steam time or take them out a few minutes before the taters are tender and done.

Ingredients:

  • 2-1/2 pounds yellow or red potatoes, scrubbed and diced (1/2″ to 1″)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt, DIVIDED
  • 1/2 cup mayo
  • 1/2 cup low-fat plain yogurt
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion (3)
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
  • 1 cup chopped celery (5)

Directions:

  1. Bring 1-2 inches of water to a boil in a large saucepan or pot fitted with a steaming basket. Add potatoes, cover, and cook until tender, 12-15 minutes depending on your stove (while cooking, jump to #2). When done, spread the taters, in a single layer, onto a lined baking sheet (aluminum foil makes an excellent lining and easy for cleanup) and sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt; let cool 15 minutes.
  2. Whisk mayo, yogurt, onion, mustard, pepper, and remaining salt (1/2 tsp) in a large bowl. Once the potatoes are cooled, add them to the mixture along with the eggs and celery; stir to coat.

Serve at room temp or refrigerate until cold. The salad can be made up to 1 day, covered, and refrigerated.

Nutritional Information

Serving Size: ¾ cup; Per Serving: 146 calories; 4 g fat (1 g sat.); 2 g fiber; 24 g carbohydrates, 5 g protein; 27 mcg folate; 40 mg cholesterol; 3 g sugars; 1 g added sugar; 109 IU Vitamin A; 7 mg Vitamin C; 48 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 325 mg sodium; 552 mg potassium

Carbohydrate Servings: 1 ½
Exchanges: 1 ½ starch, 1 fat

Health Benefits:

  1. Low-fat plain yogurt (LFPY) adds calcium, which is needed for teeth and bones, and it is a high-quality protein to help build and repair muscles. LFPY also has live, healthy gut bacteria, which aids in digestion and some who are lactose intolerant may be able to intake small amounts of this yogurt. Still, this healthy substitute stimulates the immune system, and if you are looking to add MORE protein and creaminess, substitute with Greek yogurt.
  2. The skin on taters provides whopping values of fiber to keep you regular, potassium to control blood pressure, and many other vitamins and minerals. Most of the fiber, roughly half, is found in the skin, but beyond the skin, you’ll find most of the vitamin C, which is vital for healthy skin and hair. Potato and its skin also house vitamins B1 and B6; B1 assist in the bodies energy system, and Pyroxidene (B6) is vital for the central nervous system. This carbohydrate contains little to no fat, cholesterol, and calories but it does contain iron, magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu). For healthy blood, our bodies require iron, and for wound healing, Mg, Zn, and Cu take on the job. Last tidbit: Compared to bananas, which have 9g Mg, potatoes out win with 20g Mg, and for a greater nutrient powerhouse, go for the red taters.
  3. Have you ever taken a bite out of a raw onion? If not, I dare you to! Similar to potatoes, onions also contain vitamin C and fiber, along with healthy plant “chemicals” that are thought to prevent some types of cancer, based on studies. Onions are low in fat and calories and again, similar to potatoes, red onions pack a higher nutrient punch.
  4. HUMPTY DUMPTY (Eggs) does NOT spike blood cholesterol, but instead, he does the opposite by raising “good” cholesterol or HDL’s (I call this the happy cholesterol and LDL’s the lowsy cholesterol). All 9 essential amino acids (needed to make proteins) can be found in an egg. Essential indicates that your body cannot make them, they must come from diet. Eggs also provide a healthy dose of Omega 3’s to protect the brain and heart, carotenoids to protect our eyes, and vitamin D to protect our bones.
  5. Did you know that CELERY was once prescribed as an anti-hypertensive many centuries ago? Yeah, I didn’t either. I thought the only nutrition in celery was water, but nope, there is so much more. These gorgeous green, crisp stalks provide vitamin C and act as a diuretic to flush out excess fluid. Yes, ladies, we need our celery! If you suffer from inflammation, celeries properties may help. If you have high cholesterol and blood pressure, phthalates in celery may help lower it, and if you are trying to minimize your cancer risk, coumarins found in the stalks may provide some comfort.

These claims are all based on evidence-based studies; however, PLEASE see your dietitian and doctor before making drastic changes in your diet if you have any of the medical conditions stated above.

3 Ways to Keep Mercury and Arsenic Out of Your Gluten-Free Diet

A few tips on how to avoid these toxins.

 

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Mercury and arsenic are toxic metals that have been associated with a higher risk of neurological problems, cancer, and heart disease. In the past, there have been some headlines relating these metals to a gluten-free diet (g-free), reporting that intake of gluten-free foods may expose one to higher toxic levels. Rice, often substituted in more significant amounts for wheat in gluten-free foods, may store arsenic and mercury due to soil and environmental elements. Therefore, researchers from the University of Illinois set out to examine possible health consequences of a g-free diet vs. a non-gluten free diet. The study ranged from 2009-2014, and participants (73 persons) were chosen if they adhered to a gluten-free diet for those years. Subjects ages varied from 6 years old to 80 years, and participants consented to a blood and urinalysis.

The results showed the participant’s mercury blood levels were 70% higher and urine tests showed twice the arsenic concentrations compared to the non-gluten group. Therefore, the study determined that following a gluten-free diet may result in unexpected health outcomes. Keep in mind; however, the researchers did not examine if rice was the primary cause of metals in the participant’s diets, the study population was small, and the amounts of the metals associated with mercury poisoning and arsenic toxicity were much lower in both participants diets (gluten and non-gluten foods). The research does not mean that going gluten-free will automatically increase your intake of these metals, but it is a good indicator to take caution when choosing g-free foods. Below are three tips on how to optimize your health if gluten-free is the food plan for you.

Eat more whole, fresh foods

Who doesn’t love a slice a pizza (actually, that really sounds good about now!!) or a cookie every now and then? Pizza, cookies, and almost any food these days can be found gluten-free. And what do most of these goods have in common? Many are made with rice and refined flour, as well as added sugar, sodium, and other unwanted additives. Refined flour is stripped of fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants; in other words, it’s highly processed. So, if you are following the “healthy brick road,” some of those g-free treats should be consumed as a treat; only on occasions and not part of the daily staples.

Please note: Simply being gluten-free does not give all products the green light consumption. To ensure clean eating, strive for fresh, whole, minimally processed foods instead of g-free products that contain ingredients you probably cannot pronounce.

Alternate gluten-free foods

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There are various types of gluten-free grains, such as amaranth, teff, corn, millet, sorghum, oats, quinoa, buckwheat, and don’t forget pulses, which include beans, lentils, chickpeas, and peas. Starchy vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, yams, fingerling potatoes, and squash are also g-free. Your goal for meal planning is to choose whole, fresh, natural foods and switch up your selections every now and then. For example, try sweet potato toast and a side of blacks beans with your omelet for breakfast, add lentils or quinoa to your lunch salad, munch on veggies and hummus for your daily snack, and try out spaghetti squash for dinner.

Consume low-mercury seafood

Despite the mercury found in this study, seafood is a significant contributor to a healthy diet. To determine what sea dwellers to avoid, check out the EPA-FDA’s 2017 Advice on Consuming Fish and Shellfish. You should be safe consuming rainbow trout, clams, shrimp, Alaskan salmon, and Atlantic mackerel; however, air on the side of caution with lobster, canned tuna, sea bass, mahi-mahi, crab, and cod, and consume swordfish, king mackerel, grouper, and shark at your own risk. The latter options have shown to contain the highest amounts of mercury.

Just like any eating plan, strive for a healthy balance of the real stuff, don’t be afraid to try new foods, and save those treats for occasions!

Nutrition Nugget

Make time for breakfast! If you skip breakfast, it’s harder to get all the nutrients your body needs throughout the day. Breakfast can be as simple as a piece of fruit and whole grain toast, or low-fat yogurt.

W.O.Day Nugget

Curtal: Shortened, abridged, or curtailed

Inspiration Nugget

Dear God, If I am wrong, right me, if I am lost, guide me, if I start to give up, keep me going. Lead me in light and love.

“Continuing to seek happiness in all the wrong places, people, and things are what drives our cycle of suffering. Yes, we would prefer the luxury life of cozy and secure, the comfortable over the uncomfortable but these safety zones continue to fall apart and offer no true comfort. We cannot keep ourselves enclosed in a cocoon with a limited view of reality and avoid discomfort and pain if true happiness, security, and comfort is what we seek.”

~ Me

 

 

How to Beat Back Cravings When Just Seeing Sweets Makes You Lust for Them

Do you get “weak in the willpower” when office donuts arrive? Ever scarfed down that last slice or two of your favorite cake, or a homemade brownie, or that leftover Halloween candy that your colleagues keep bringing in to work after you’ve checked your hunger level and told self, “nope, not hungry at all?” Then, I’m going to assume that you are well aware that sweat treats, when insight, can lead to severe sugar cravings. Foods that are bathed primarily in fat, sugar, flavors, and additives are known as hyper-palatable, and these foods release dopamine, a neurotransmitter released when neurons are triggered. Dopamine is the driving factor to your consumption of that sweet treat staring at you.

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“A lot of people don’t make the connection that there’s something physiological happening when they see hyper-palatable foods,” says Eliza Kingsford, a psychotherapist. “This is not a signal that your body is hungry or needs nutrients; instead, it is a response to dopamine.” It is possible; however, to control cravings. Walking past the cookie jar or the ice cream isle can be bearable with a few tips and tricks.

Step 1: Keep moving

Cut ties with those yummy desserts. Instead of watching your favorite Food Network show, put in a non-food movie. See caramel and chocolate while surfing the net? Click on the link to pay bills in your favorites bar. The candy jar at work? Don’t walk past it and if you have to, phone a friend.

“Sometimes it’s as simple as out of sight, out of mind,” says Keri Gans, RD, author of The Small Change Diet. “Distancing yourself can lessen the craving.”

Step 2: Distract yourself

You made it out alive after passing the cookie jar and not giving in, but you still have a sweet tooth craving, so what do you do? You set the mind on anything besides sugar, suggests Gans. Phone a friend, study something (there is always new research to be learned), brush your teeth. “You want to do anything besides sitting there and thinking about the food,” says Gans.

Step 3: Get mindful

It is inevitable that situations and events will arise where you can’t turn or run away from food, like a mad person; this is when mindfulness comes in handy. Take a breath, slow down, and get in touch with how the craving feels. Is the desire really what you want? The choice is yours. Image result for How to Beat Back Cravings When Just Seeing Sweets Makes You Lust for Them

Step 4: Relish every bite

Unfortunately, this step doesn’t work for everyone. If you’re like me and have ever devoured an entire pint or more of cookie dough ice cream or any ice cream or any sweet bite, then you are likely in the “unfortunate” category. However, if you have the willpower to stop after that small bite, I truly admire you, and you are exempt from the “unfortunate” class! For the rest of us, try to keep your attention on the mouthfeel and sweetness. If you want to make it more pleasurable, shout from the rooftops, “I love how the frosting and whipped cream melts on my tongue, and that cake is so moist!”

Step 5: Set realistic guidelines

Ok, you know you’re heading into a temptation zone, like Halloween; however, surrendering yourself to the candy jar or the Halloween stash brought in by the youngens probably won’t work. So, make a few rules, such as one small piece daily and don’t veer from that rule.

Step 6: Make a negative association

Are you triggered by fluffy pancakes or melting ice cream sandwich ads on TV? Consider the reality behind those commercials, says Kingsford: “There are billions of dollars poured into the marketing industry to elicit food cravings,” she says. “But what you see in those images is sprayed-on lacquer, crazy chemicals to make foods melt a certain way, dyes and markers, and weird lighting. Would you eat that? No, that’s disgusting.”

Step 7: Reflect on how you will feel if you give in

Ask yourself,  “Do I really want this sugar bomb?” If yes, then ask, “Will I feel shame and guilt if I eat it?” If you are still stuck, go back to question 1 “Do I really, really want this sweet goody?” After you have made it this far into the thought process, your mind is ready to move to the next subject and say “toodles” to that dessert.

The finale: Keep a healthier version of a favorite treat on hand.

If your mouth waters every time your co-worker opens a bag of M&Ms, try packing your own clean treat, so you don’t feel deprived, such as a granola bar, yogurt, fruit. And if it’s baked goods you crave, bring a homemade version of the “clean” treat sweetened with maple syrup instead of refined sugar.

You can do! Have faith and believe in yourself and know one set back is not a lifetime of regret. You are human so live life and enjoy it! You never know when the next challenge will hit.

Nutritional Nugget

Take grains on the go! Popcorn, whole-grain rice cakes, and crackers are convenient, on-the-go snacks. Be sure to make at least half your grains whole.

WODal Nugget

Invigorate: To give strength and/or energy to something or someone

Inspirational Nugget

And every day, the world will drag you by the hand, yelling, "This is important! And this is important! And this is important! You need to worry about this! And this! And this!" And each day, it's up to you to yank your hand back, put it on your heart and say, "No. This is what's important." - Iain Thomas, I Wrote This For You

“Pleasant and unpleasant situations are both part of our lives that is inevitable.”

~ Me

 

Should you be drinking kombucha?

Soft drink sales are falling, but kombucha sales are rising! Homebrewers have been producing this favored fermented drink for thousands of years, and increasingly we see kombucha on the drink menus at restaurants, on tap in cafes and health food stores, and in supermarkets. So what is it? Is it good for us? Is all kombucha created equal????

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What is kombucha, exactly?

Traditionally, it is a drink produced by fermenting sweet tea, resulting in a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast (S.C.O.B.Y.). During the process, sugar is converted from yeast and produces alcohol. The bacteria then convert the alcohol to organic acids, such as acetic acid, and the lightly effervescent, mildly sour, refreshing drink, kombucha, is created. You often find it bottled in flavors like ginger, passionfruit, lemon, and raspberry. Kombucha is touted, not only for its low sugar content but also for its health benefits, such as stimulating the immune system, preventing cardiovascular disease and some cancers.

And with Coca-Cola buying into the kombucha craze, it’s only going to increase in mainstream popularity.

Is it good for me?

With all the hype, it’s understandable to wonder if kombucha is something you should be drinking on a regular basis. There are many reported beneficial effects of kombucha, and some brands even suggest you should drink a bottle each day to reap the benefits.

Kombucha certainly has a lot going on:

  • It contains live cultures of bacteria and yeast, which can act as probiotics, and studies have concluded that these live microorganisms may benefit their host by protecting against diseases, improving digestion, and enhancing immune function.
    The organic acids produced during the fermentation process have been shown to slow the growth of pathogenic bacteria, such as Staph aureus, Salmonella, and E. coli.
  • Because Kombucha is made from tea, it contains polyphenols (naturally occurring plant chemicals) known as catechins, which have antioxidant properties and can protect or act against some cancers, tumors, and unwanted genetic changes.

Kombucha is a potential source for a range of bioactive components, and these components can significantly differ based on the quantity and types of sugar and tea used, the microorganisms presents, and fermenting temperature and time.
Whether these bioactive components make it into the gut in sufficient numbers to have a beneficial impact is up for debate and varies based on an individuals gut flora. According to senior research scientist Dr. Michael Conlon, who specializes in diet and gut health, “The health potential of probiotics more generally can vary depending on the number and type of microbes, what you consume them with, and the composition of your gut microflora. It’s likely the number of microbes in kombucha would be much lower than what you might see in a commercial probiotic product.” He added that “fermentation generates certain types of acid and other bioactive compounds that can be beneficial, but whether they get through to the large bowel so that a benefit can be gained is unknown.”

Research regarding the claimed benefits has mostly been studied on animals. Conlon continues with “there’s a lack of scientific evidence from human clinical trials to support the claims, and more research is needed.” Image result for should you be drinking kombucha

But, what about the sugar?

Throughout the fermentation process, most of the sugar is consumed by the yeast, and any residual left is based on fermenting time. As per the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a product can only be labeled “low sugar” if it contains 25% less sugar that it’s original brand or no more than 0.5g to be labeled “sugar-free.” The sugar content per an 8 oz bottle of most unflavored kombucha products is roughly 2-6g. Those that favor more on the sweeter side are still a better choice; when compared to the standard soft drink, Coca-Cola (39g sugar per 12oz), Orange Juice (9g per 3.5oz), Gatorade (6g per 3.5 oz), Lipton Mango Ice Tea (11g per 8.5oz), Glaceau Vitamin Water (32g per 20oz). Sugary drinks provide excess calories, and excess calories may lead to obesity, weight gain, some types of cancer, type-2-diabetes, and heart disease, to name a few. Therefore, the increased availability of lower sugar alternatives, like kombucha, can make a real difference, and for someone with a coke-a-day habit that adds up to a whopping 12,700g.

Does it contain alcohol?

Some alcohol remains in kombucha after the fermentation process, but it’s usually in trace amounts, and because it is sold as a soft drink it needs to comply with state-based alcohol legislation and labeled with its alcohol content (less than 0.5% alcohol by volume in the United States). However, controlling the fermentation to achieve a product with just enough acidity and sweetness, and ensuring the alcohol content meets state-based regulations is a balancing act, one that’s particularly tricky when producing on a large scale. There have been occurrences where the alcohol content went a little wild, and products were recalled. In 2010, the grocery chain, Whole Foods Market, (now owned by Amazon), recalled all kombucha products on its shelves including multimillion-dollar brand leader GT’s Kombucha, when samples tested were found to be more alcoholic than labeled.

When kombucha is not getting recalled, its minimal alcohol content can be a significant drawcard. The non-alcoholic options may be limited in pubs and bars, you may not like soft drinks and get tired of drinking juice and sparkling water, so Kombucha may be a good alternative. Although it is low in alcohol, its tart, lightly acidic flavor profile and palate-cleansing properties make it a drink that readily complements food, much like wine. Who knows, maybe you can reduce your alcohol consumption by pairing kombucha with your favorite foods instead of that glass of wine (but, let me know how that works out if you do make the swap).

Should I drink it?

Kombucha may be touted as ‘an immortal health elixir, a ‘living superfood’ that’s ‘rich in antioxidants and acids, and has the potential for containing beneficial health properties. But there is no guarantee that these features directly translate into actual health benefits or that drinking it will ‘make you feel great.’ A claim that ‘it harmonizes your body, mind and spirit’ is puffery. However, if you like the taste, you’re looking for an exciting alternative to alcohol or sugary soft drinks, or you don’t mind the price tag (roughly $5-10 per 16oz bottle in the supermarket), kombucha may be the drink for you.

Is all kombucha created equal?

Currently, there is no standard definition for kombucha, so products sold can vary widely. Compared to traditional recipes, kombucha sold in supermarkets, etc. have little similarities. Producers have gone into “overdrive” in production because of high demand. To make sure you “get what you pay for,” check drink labels and educate yourself:

  • Ingredients? If you see live cultures floating at the top, that is a good indicator the drink is made from a S.C.O.B.Y. but take caution with ingredients like “kombucha extract.”
  • Reefer? Refrigeration prevents further fermentation, which can affect the taste and produce more alcohol, so if the kombucha you buy does not require refrigeration, it may have been pasteurized. While this can help control the alcohol content and extend shelf life, the drink will likely have fewer active microorganisms as a result. Always refrigerate the fermented beverage before consumption, unless it has been pasteurized. However, although yeast has been filtered and the alcohol content is stabilized, at warmer temperatures, any remaining yeast, and other microbes can still grow and be active, posing a health risk.
  • ETOH content? Research the company to see how often they sample their product’s alcohol contents. Some companies may check the content of each batch or less frequently, such as once a year.
  • Added sweeteners? One of the main ingredients needed to make kombucha is sugar, but this is mostly used up during fermentation. Some products may contain non-nutritive sweeteners erythritol and stevia that make the kombucha taste sweeter without adding calories, which may or may not appeal depending on your stance on added sweeteners.
  • Outrageous health claims? Therapeutic claims are not permitted on foods, and if a company wants to state on the label that its kombucha has a specific health effect, the claim has to be one of those pre-approved under the FDA. The product, also, must meet certain conditions, and if you see a claim that “seems to good to be true,” it probably is.

Is Kombucha safe?

According to U.S. federal laws and regulations, kombucha is considered a traditional food. In other words, it does not require pre-approval, and there are no specific quality controls or manufacturing practices for it (as long as the alcohol content is not above 0.5% or continues to ferment after bottling), other than the general requirement under the FDA that it be safe and suitable. In 1995 the possibility of toxic effects and acidosis when consumed in large quantities became a public concern after two incidents in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC); however, both parties had severe pre-existing conditions that made them susceptible to acidosis. The investigations concluded that kombucha is not harmful when consumed in small quantities (roughly 4 ounces daily) unless of course, you have pre-existing conditions. In 2010, some commercial producers were forced to recall unpasteurized versions from grocery store shelves when the alcohol content exceeded 0.5%.

Yes, kombucha poses a higher risk when not prepared correctly but most forms of this fermented food represent a relatively low threat. The popularity and commercialization of the brewed drinks are increasing and with growth and the “popular vote,” comes work in promoting best manufacturing practices.

Nutritional Nugget

How do you like your apples? Sweet, crisp apples can be paired with almost anything! Dip into peanut butter for a quick snack or toss in a salad for that perfectly sweet crunch.

WODal Nugget

Melisma: A group of notes sung to one syllable of text

Inspirational Nugget

God's plan is always the best. Sometimes the process is painful and hard. But don't forget that when God is silent, He is doing something good for you.

 

Pain is an inevitable part of human life, as is pleasure. The difference with pain; however, is – we have to grow up to the fact, mature to the fact, and relax to the fact that there will be pain in our lives, but there should also be a good balance of pleasure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Types Of Noodles That Are Healthier Than Past

When it comes to wellness, it’s all about balance, where nutrient ratio, portion size, and mindfulness can keep you on track with your health and fitness goals.

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So, you’re still allowing “self” to have pasta on occasions, but did you know that giving in to your indulgences, sometimes those “guilty pleasures,” and enjoying a diversity of foods is actually good for the body and soul? Plus, you’ll be more inclined to choose healthier options in the long run when you allow yourself to “give in.” Another plus, if your pasta choice is whole wheat and is roughly a 1/2 cup cooked portion size, then it’s not necessary to consume this yummy carbohydrate only on occasions (unless you have a medical condition that states otherwise). Unfortunately, you can’t eat pasta all day, every day (yeah, I’m still bummed about that!). It’s not exactly healthy if you do, so here are a few options to amp up the nutritional profile, when you’ve already had your days worth of pasta, or you are doing a bit of carb counting.

Edamame Noodles

Edamame isn’t just a great appetizer at an Asian restaurant, it is also a soy-based, protein-rich noodle, and one that pairs well with several flavors, such as pesto dishes (the green color matches perfectly) and a good old-fashioned tomato sauce. And the nutritional benefits? A 1-cup serving of edamame noodles has 25 grams of protein, 210 calories, and 11 grams of fiber. Related image

Chickpea Noodles

Although they’re lower in protein (roughly 14 grams) and fiber (8 grams), they are an excellent alternative, especially for people who don’t tolerate soy or gluten products well. And, you can find these noodles in many grocery stores.

Black Bean

Instead of throwing some black beans on a salad, try eating them in noodle form. With the same nutritional profile as edamame, but with less protein, it’s a good idea to pair these beans with lean meat, tofu, or fish for a more satisfying, muscle-building meal. Black beans are also versatile and high in fiber, so they’ll keep you regular and full. And for a healthy dose of fats, top with avocado and serve at your next Mexican “fiesta” night.

Shirataki Noodles

Did you ever think you could have a zero calorie pasta dish? Well, you can. These noodles are incredibly useful for carb-conscious people, as they have less than one gram per 1 cup serving. Made from konjac flour and water, they are a great way to “fill up,” with few calories. However, to make a complete meal, you will need to add some extra protein and fats. Some good choices? Stir-fry or pair with meat, fish, or tofu to make it more substantial. And, as these are popular in Asian cuisine, you can try a thick, rich peanut sauce to get it to really stick to your bones.

Nutritional Nugget

Vary your protein routine… with seeds! Save your pumpkin seeds. Dry, roast and serve them in salads or enjoy as a crunchy snack.

WODal Nugget

Saudade: (especially with reference to songs or poetry) A feeling of longing, melancholy, or nostalgia that is supposedly characteristic of the Portuguese or Brazilian temperament.

Inspirational Nugget

Fall in love with souls, not faces.

“In the teachings on the four noble truths, suffering is talked about. The first noble truth says simply that it’s part of being human to feel discomfort. If we resist it, the reality and vitality of life become misery. The second noble truth says that this resistance is the fundamental operating mechanism of what we call ego. The third noble truth says that the cessation of suffering is letting go of holding on to ourselves. There is no need to resist being fully alive in this world.”

~Pema ChÖdrÖn

 

 

 

 

 

Calorie restriction slows age-related epigenetic changes

Researchers found that calorie restriction slows age-related epigenetic changes in mice and monkeys. The findings suggest a mechanism for how calorie restriction extends lifespan.

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Ok….lets feel better about aging!

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Calorie restriction has been shown to extend lifespan in several different species, but the underlying reason isn’t known. During normal aging, epigenetic changes occur throughout cells in the body. These changes alter the way genes are switched on and off without changing the DNA sequence itself. Levels of one type of epigenetic modification, called DNA methylation, have been shown to roughly reflect a person’s age. To investigate whether caloric restriction affects DNA methylation, a team of scientists led by Dr. Jean-Pierra J. Issa at Temple University examined the epigenetic profiles of mice, rhesus monkeys, and humans at different ages. They then tested whether these changes were altered by a calorie-restricted diet in mice and monkeys.

The team first analyzed DNA methylation in blood from mice, rhesus monkeys, and humans at different ages. Each species showed similar changes in DNA methylation patterns as they aged. These changes are called methylation drift, or epigenetic drift. The rates of epigenetic drift were inversely correlated with lifespan. That is, the shorter the species lifespan, the faster the changes in DNA methylation. This finding suggests that DNA methylation helps regulate the effects of aging.

The team then tested whether a calorie-restricted diet could slow methylation drift by feeding a group of mice 40% fewer calories than controls starting when they were 0.3 years old until they were 2.7 to 3.2 years old. They also fed rhesus monkeys a diet with 30% fewer calories than controls starting at the age of 7–14 years old until they were 22 to 30 years old. The changes in DNA methylation patterns slowed for the animals fed a calorie-restricted diet. Monkeys on a calorie-restricted diet showed the same patterns of DNA methylation as monkeys who were 7 years younger but had eaten regular diets. This methylation age difference was even higher in mice.

The team then compared the rates of epigenetic drift to telomere shortening. Telomeres are molecular caps at the ends of chromosomes. Their length has previously been linked to the aging process. Calorie restriction had no measurable effect on telomere length. “The impacts of calorie restriction on lifespan have been known for decades, but thanks to modern quantitative techniques, we are able to show for the first time a striking slowing down of epigenetic drift as lifespan increases,” Issa says.

More studies are needed to better understand why age-related epigenetic changes occur faster in some people than others, and whether altering them could help prolong human life. The study was funded by National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institute on Aging (NIA). Results appeared online on September 14, 2017, in Nature Communications.

Adapted from: Caloric restriction delays age-related methylation drift. Maegawa S, Lu Y, Tahara T, Lee JT, Madzo J, Liang S, Jelinek J, Colman RJ, Issa JJ. Nat Commun. 2017 Sep 14;8(1):539. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00607-3. PMID: 28912502.

Nutritional Nugget

Barely eat barley? This hearty whole grain can be used in soups, salads, risottos, or cooked like oatmeal for breakfast.

WOD Nugget

Jaded: Bored or lacking enthusiasm, typically after having had too much of something

Inspiration Nugget

The longer you wait for something, the more you appreciate it when it finally arrives. The harder you fight for something, the more priceless it becomes once you achieve it. The more pain you endure on your journey, the sweeter the arrival at your destination. Remember... all good things are worth waiting for and fighting for.

 

 

What Are the Benefits of a Raw Foods Diet?

It seems like everywhere you turn, the term “raw” appears on popular food labels. Natural food stores are stocking their shelves with commercial raw vegan products from “raw protein bars” to “raw almond butter,” “raw sugar,” and even “raw chocolate.” By some estimates, the raw foods industry has experienced double-digit growth over the past couple of years, and there are no signs of slowing down.

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The boom for the raw foods industry is not just limited to the grocery store aisles. Juice shops are opening up in cities across the country, promoting the benefits of consuming raw, fresh-pressed fruits and vegetables. Bottled, unpasteurized juices are becoming more readily available at mainstream stores and even coffee shop chains. With this influx of raw food and beverage options in the market, it can be difficult to discern what the optimal foods are if you want to follow a proper raw foods diet. Without adequate information, many consumers are often left wondering “is this diet truly healthy?”

Can I really survive on just vegetables?

Two of the very first questions curious minds may ask about a raw foods diet is, “What can I eat?” and “Can I really survive on just vegetables?” It is important to note that a healthy raw vegan diet consists of a wide variety of plant-based foods. This includes fresh vegetables, sprouts, nuts, seeds, grains, and fruits. These living foods are rich in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and plant-based proteins. They supply the oxygen, alkalinity, and bioelectrical charges vital for cellular health, detoxifying the body, and for overall well-being.

The juicing benefits of wheatgrass, discovered by Ann Wigmore, have been popping up in many health facilities and institutes. These organizations are taking the raw foods diet a step further by incorporating wheatgrass as a central component of their living foods program, as well as using wheatgrass as a dietary supplement and healing tool.

Wheatgrass: Nature’s greatest healer

Wheatgrass is considered nature’s ”greatest healer” and is a complete food with an ideal alkaline-acid balance. Just one ounce of wheatgrass contains 103 vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. Wheatgrass is also a powerful detoxifier and cleanses the blood due to its high chlorophyll content (your liver; however, is you BEST detoxifier). It helps rid the body of heavy metals, pollutants, and other toxins that become stored in the body’s tissues and organs over the years. Those who are proponents will often drink daily shots of wheatgrass, taken on an empty stomach first thing in the morning, in addition to eating a rich raw vegan diet.

Raw foods are prepared using cold-pressed oils and are heated or dehydrated at low temperatures, if at all. You may also find them made using organic oils such as olive, hemp, and raw sesame. Instead of vinegar – lemon, limes, and herbs may also be used. As a rule, for foods to be raw, they must be “cooked” at temperatures lower than 115 degrees. Our bodies need all the enzymes available in the food we eat, and heating food above 115 degrees destroys most of the plant’s nutrients and causes the food to be unrecognizable to our bodies.

Reversing disease with a raw foods diet

A living foods diet may provide enormous health benefits for those looking to improve their general health and for those who want to prevent premature aging or help reverse certain diseases. Living foods are so beneficial because they contain four essential elements that support the immune system: Hormones, oxygen, phytochemicals, and enzymes. By nourishing your body with these immune-boosting elements, instead of toxins and chemicals, people who adopt a proper raw vegan diet often experience increased vitality, energy, and mental clarity, to name just a few benefits. A living-foods diet may also help reverse some ailments and diseases.

While the benefits of a raw foods diet are numerous, getting started can be overwhelming at first, so below are some tips for transitioning to a raw foods diet. No matter where you are on your health journey, everyone can begin with these easy steps: Follow them and your life may begin to transform.

First Tip: Find a local juice bar where you can get a big dose of veggie nutrition (or purchase a juicer for home use).

Juicing is the fastest and best way for the body to get all the essential vitamins and nutrients it needs. Within 20 minutes of drinking fresh vegetable juice, your body begins to absorb all the nutrients it just consumed, meaning you can start feeling better immediately. You may choose to sip on a gallon of green juice throughout the day or start with a shot a day (or half a shot a day) and work yourself up to four ounces each day.  One signature drink that has shown promise for its health benefits is a green juice containing five ounces each of sunflower sprouts, pea sprouts, cucumber, and celery. If you visit the local juice bar, make sure to include that shot of wheatgrass. It provides the full range of vitamins and minerals and is also a complete source of protein.

Second Tip: Stay away from freeze-dried and powered alternatives.

Some research shows that wheatgrass supplements and freeze-dried powders are only two percent as efficient as fresh-juiced wheatgrass consumed within 15 minutes of juicing. The nutrients in wheatgrass begin to oxidize or break down, very quickly after that 15-minute period.

Third Tip: Try and make at least one meal each day a big salad full of fresh vegetables.

The benefits of eating fresh, unprocessed vegetables are many. Make sure to add plenty of green vegetables to your salad, as they are the foods most commonly missing in our modern diet. Greens are very high in calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, phosphorous, zinc, as well as fiber, folic acid, chlorophyll, and other micronutrients and phytochemicals. Try experimenting with greens such as bok choy, kale, mustard greens, broccoli rabé, or dandelion root.

If you are feeling particularly adventurous, you may also want to try adding sprouted lentils, sprouted broccoli rabé, or sprouted alfalfa to your salad. Sprouts contain a super concentration of natural enzymes that are easily digestible, making them up to 30 times more nutritious than even organic vegetables.

Take it slow

Transitioning to a raw vegan diet can be challenging; the critical thing to remember is to take it slow. Try one thing at a time and continue to build on each success.

Adapted from: Brian Clement Ph.D., NMD, CN

Nutrition Nugget

Make it a combo! Combine food groups for a satisfying snack— low-fat yogurt and berries, apple with peanut butter, whole-grain crackers with turkey and avocado.

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